Who are You Thanking this Thanksgiving?

Who or what are they thanking on Thanksgiving? A sign at an elementary school caught my attention. It read, “Bless America.” The question that came to mind was, “Who or what are they calling on to bless America?” Even with the unabashed call for God to bless America, there is no specific God in mind. Is it Aristotle’s “Unmoved Mover”? How about Jefferson’s absentee landlord god?

What are children told about Thanksgiving in our nation’s government (public) schools? Ancient fish that evolutionists claim are our grandmothers? “Grandmother Fish is the first book to teach evolution to preschoolers.” Are children to thank the molecules that sprung into existence and evolved from “the primal goo to you”?

Grove City College Professor Paul Kengor recalls a conversation he “had with a friend who works in the children’s section at Barnes & Noble” and “regularly briefs [him] on the latest political correctness and rank secularism pervading today’s books.”

She told him that in all the books on Thanksgiving, only one mentioned that God was the one being thanked.

Kengor asked her, “What are they giving thanks to?”

“They’re just thankful,” she said vaguely. “They’re simply thankful.”

“Thankful for what?” Kengor asked.

She again emphasized: “They’re just thankful.”

Kengor asked her, “What are they giving thanks to?”

Thanksgiving’s Beginnings

In 1777, Congress issued a proclamation for a day of thanksgiving. A day was to be set aside for “solemn thanksgiving and praise.” The proclamation called upon all citizens to “join the penitent confession of their manifold sins,” and to offer “their humble and earnest supplication that it may please God through the merits of Jesus Christ, mercifully to forgive and blot them out of remembrance.”

On Thursday, September 24, 1789, the first House of Representatives voted to recommend–in its exact wording–the First Amendment of the newly drafted Constitution to the states for ratification. The next day, Congressman Elias Boudinot from New Jersey proposed that the House and Senate jointly request of President Washington to proclaim a day of thanksgiving for “the many signal favors of Almighty God.” Boudinot said that he “could not think of letting the session pass over without offering an opportunity to all the citizens of the United States of joining, with one voice, in returning to Almighty God their sincere thanks for the many blessings he had poured down upon them.”1

Roger Sherman spoke in favor of the proposal by reminding his colleagues that the practice of thanksgiving is “warranted by a number of precedents in holy writ [the Bible]: for instance, the solemn thanksgivings and rejoicings which took place in the time of Solomon, after the building of the temple…. This example, he thought, worthy of Christian imitation on the present occasion.”2

George Washington stated, “it is the duty of all nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey His will, to be grateful for His benefits, and humbly to implore His protection and favor.” He went on in his Thanksgiving Proclamation of October 3, 1789 to write, that as a nation “we may then unite in most humbly offering our prayers and supplications to the great Lord and Ruler of Nations, and beseech Him to pardon our national and other transgressions.”3

A People Full of Thanksgiving

The colonists of another era were aware of the many instances of thanksgiving celebrations found in “holy writ.” Thanksgiving, as it was practiced by the colonists, was a religious celebration that shared the sentiments of their biblical descendants, giving thanks to God for His faithful provision even in times of want. For these faithful people, giving thanks to God came naturally…

 

Read the Rest of this Important Story at GaryDeMar.com 

Gary DeMar

Gary DeMar was raised in the suburbs of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He is a graduate of Western Michigan University (1973) and Reformed Theological Seminary (1979). He has served as researcher and writer at the Christian Worldview ministry American Vision since 1980 and President since 1984. Today he serves as Senior Fellow at American Vision where he lectures, researches, and writes on various worldview issues.
Gary is the author of 30 books on a variety of topics – from “America’s Christian History” and “God and Government” to “Thinking Straight in a Crooked World” to “Last Days Madness.”
Gary has been interviewed by Time magazine, CNN, MSNBC, FOX, the BBC, and Sean Hannity. He has done numerous radio and television interviews, including the “Bible Answer Man,” hosted by Hank Hanegraaff and “Today’s Issues” with Tim Wildmon and Marvin Sanders. Newspaper interviews with Gary have appeared in the Washington Times, Toledo (Ohio) Blade, the Sacramento Bee, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Marietta Daily Journal, San Francisco Chronicle, The Orlando Sentinel, and the Chicago Tribune.

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