The Queen of England Honors the Queen of Soul During Buckingham Palace’s Changing of the Guards

On Friday, August 31st, thousands gathered in Detroit to celebrate the life of the Queen of Soul, Aretha Franklin, who lost her battle with pancreatic cancer on August 16th.

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There are few singers globally as well-known, well-loved, or iconic as Franklin, and, in a highly divisive time, it’s been heartwarming to see so many people coming together to honor the life of a woman whose incredible talent will surely remain in the canon of great modern music for eternity.

Across the pond, Queen Elizabeth decided to use her vast resources to honor Franklin, in a tribute that was, well, fit for a queen. Quite literally.

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Western Journal reports that every couple of months, when the guards at Buckingham Palace are rotated out, a performance by the Band of the Welsh Guard is often used to mark momentous occasions.

For example, following the 9/11 terror attacks, the bank performed the American National Anthem in an emotional tribute.

This month, they honored Aretha, playing her most famous song and certainly one of the most recognizable tunes of modern pop culture: Respect.

A very British, very royal tribute from one Queen to another.

RIP, Aretha, you will be missed.

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