Senator Ben Sasse says America has allowed our Young Adults to Act as Children

Senator Ben Sasse (R-NE) recently appeared with conservative pundit Bill Kristol to talk about the seeming epidemic of “arrested development” that has swept across our nation.

The conversation revolved around a book that Senator Sasse has just released titled, “The Vanishing American Adult: Our Coming of Age Crisis and How to Rebuild a Culture of Self-Reliance.”

Sasse, argues that the decision of parents in recent years to keep their children from experiencing “work,” has led to a lack of important character building opportunities for this generation. In part because of this, our young adults have been allowed to cling to their childhood instead of being pushed to “act their age” and embrace the responsibilities that come along with adulthood.

“We’ve created this new idea that you can have a greenhouse-sheltered environment for two, three, or four years. And it’s great. It’s glorious. And yet, it’s always been a transitional state. It’s not supposed to be Peter Pan. You don’t want to be stranded in Neverland. It’s a hell if you don’t get to become an adult.”

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Sasse mentioned his time as President of Midland University in Fremont, Nebraska as evidence of this trend.

“What shocked me about the experience of arriving at the school is that overwhelmingly, the incoming students had never worked before. They’d never done any hard labor. They just never really had to do any work of any kind,” Sasse told Kristol.

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