Russia

REPORT: 12 Liberal Media Outlets Connected to Shady Russian IT Firm

For the last two years, it has been absolutely impossible to tune into the mainstream media and not hear anything about some sort of Russian interference in American society.

In all honesty, it feels like we are living in some sort of strange Cold War movie filmed in the 1980’s, with preposterous Russian villains somehow usurping the most powerful country on earth’s elections, economy, and even the office of the President.  At some point, we all sort of expect Chuck Norris to drop out of a helicopter in Moscow and bust into the Kremlin with a roundhouse kick.

This is the absurd story that the left has been pushing in both the mainstream and social media circles, insinuating that the leader of the free world is nothing more than some Siberian stooge who is secretly subservient to Vladimir Putin.

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It sounds preposterous because it is preposterous.  It’s the leftist equivalent of the cringe-worthy birther movement, of which our President was once an unfortunate participant.  (Don’t get me wrong; I’m all about making sure that our President isn’t some sort of foreign agent, but, between the birthers and #RussiaGate, I don’t see a whole lot of difference).

Is this just the left’s revenge for those previous attacks on Barack Obama, or is there something more to the story.  Our bet is on the latter, as we discover just how deeply involved with Russia the liberal media truly is.

A dozen major American media and Internet outlets hired a Russian company called EastBanc Technologies to help with IT and web services, according to a Daily Caller News Foundation investigation. The companies include The Washington Post, Time, Newsweek, Slate, Facebook, AOL, Comcast and U.S. News & World Report.

Former U.S. intelligence officers slammed the media companies for hypocrisy in retaining a Russian firm while criticizing others who have even tangential ties to Russians. They also considered their decision to trust their web back-end to a foreign-based company naive.

“This clearly is a hypocrisy issue,” retired Col. James Waurishuk, a former deputy director for intelligence at the U.S. Central Command and a senior national security analyst with the National Security Counsel under President George H.W. Bush, told TheDCNF. “All of the media companies have reported Trump and the Russian collusion story that all things Russians are bad. So why are they doing business with a Russian company?”

Now for the sketchy part…

EastBanc is based and incorporated in Washington, D.C. On the surface, it appears to be a successful stand-alone American IT company. The company provides many traditional tech services including data analytics, cloud services and business intelligence, according to the company’s U.S. website.

But a counterpart company, also called EastBanc, is based in Novosibirsk, Russia, a city in Siberia.

“The company’s office is located in the Academgorodok of Novosibirsk,” the company’s Russian-language website said. “There are more than 100 specialists in the staff.”

The relationship between the two firms could be found in a 2014 powerpoint presentation produced by EastBanc. It posted the Russian and U.S. officers side-by-side along with their American and Russian clients.

And why exactly is this so concerning?  Certainly not everyone in Russia is some sort of KGB agent?

The problem here lies in the IT world’s ability to gather and interpret private data from their employees.  The emails, texts, and phone calls that occur between reporters and their often high-ranking and clandestine sources are all being handled by a mysterious Russian company who has shielded their identity with U.S.-based shell corporations.  These sources could be other reporters, or they could be CIA agents, White House staffers, or politicians themselves.

Still sound innocent?  If so, you’re not paying attention.

 

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