UFO

Recently Leaked Pentagon Report Is Real Life X-File!

No matter where you happen to land on the line between hardcore skeptic and true believer, there is always something fascinating about our governmental experience with the unknown, the “paranormal”, and the extraterrestrial.

There are some events throughout history that we will never, ever understand.  Every so often, one of these events happens to include some highly bizarre, seemingly advanced aircraft that are decidedly not of this world.

Of course, there is the most famous of them all, The Roswell Incident, in which a rancher in New Mexico believed that he himself had found the wreckage of a flying saucer.  The government responded in a peculiar way, blaming the whole thing on a weather balloon test, but the story never truly stuck.

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Another, slightly less famous event, known as The Battle of L.A. took place at the height of World War II, spooking southern California to the core.

On February 24, 1942, naval intelligence issued a warning that an attack could be expected within the next ten hours. That evening, a large number of flares and blinking lights were reported from the vicinity of defense plants. An alert was called at 7:18 pm, and was lifted at 10:23 pm. Renewed activity began early in the morning of the 25th.[5] Air raid sirens sounded at 2:25 am throughout Los Angeles County.[6] A total blackout was ordered and thousands of Air Raid Wardens were summoned to their positions. At 3:16 am the 37th Coast Artillery Brigade began firing .50 caliber machine guns and 12.8-pound anti-aircraft shells into the air at reported aircraft; over 1,400 shells would eventually be fired. Pilots of the 4th Interceptor Command were alerted but their aircraft remained grounded. The artillery fire continued sporadically until 4:14 am. The “all clear” was sounded and the blackout order lifted at 7:21 am.[7]

Several buildings and vehicles were damaged by shell fragments, and five civilians died as an indirect result of the anti-aircraft fire: three killed in car accidents in the ensuing chaos and two of heart attacks attributed to the stress of the hour-long action.[8] The incident was front-page news along the U.S. Pacific coast and across the nation.[9]

To this day, there is no definitive answer for who or what was being targeted in the night sky over Los Angeles.

In 2004, as global conflicts once again began churning in earnest, an absolutely extraordinary account of UFO activity has been leaked from within the Pentagon, and the details of the incident are incredible to say the least.

The leaked report, obtained by Las Vegas’ KLAS tv station, tells how the USS Princeton, a Ticonderoga-class guided missile cruiser, had multiple radar contacts with what it dubbed a Anomalous Aerial Vehicle (AAV).

In November 2004, the ship’s ultra-advanced AN/SPY-1 multifunctional phased-array radar caught the object hovering at 60,000 feet before nosediving to the ocean surface in a matter of seconds.

It then sped off so rapidly that crew members thought it was a ballistic missile.

It appeared again two days later, and a pair of high-tech F-18 jets were scrambled to intercept it, but pilots reported that the object had turned itself invisible.

It could still be detected as it was triggering a a circular disturbance in the water “about 50 to 100 meters in diameter.”

The craft was described as “solid white, smooth, with no edges… uniformly colored with no nacelles, pylons or wings”, and looked like “an elongated egg or Tic Tac,” according to one of the pilots.

This report comes to us just months after a similarly baffling experience was relayed by a group of separate American service members back in December.  That report also occurred in the year 2004.

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