Obama

President Obama Condescends, Calls the GOP Lazy

President Obama used his latest Weekly Address to attack the people he’s supposed to be working with for the betterment of America.

Obama’s condescension isn’t a surprise, he’s been talking down to us and to his colleagues in Congress throughout his 7 ½ years in office. However, his willingness to so blatantly mislead the American people during his weekly commentary is a bit surprising.

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For instance, he attacks the GOP for not passing a bill to fight the Zika virus’ spread. The only problem with this narrative? The GOP has attempted to pass Zika legislation several times. Each time the Democrats in Congress have blocked it in an effort to get a better funding deal for Planned Parenthood. Yet somehow, while the GOP is willing to fully fund the Zika fight and the Democrats are the one blocking it… Obama finds a way to blame the Republicans. It’s astonishing.

Then Obama blames the GOP for the government’s failures in the Louisiana flooding disaster… but somehow when the government failed during the Hurricane Katrina disaster, that wasn’t the Democrat-run Congress’ fault… it was President Bush’s. How does that work?

Finally, he blames the GOP for not confirming his latest nomination to the Supreme Court, Judge Merrick Garland. Except, the GOP is just following the Biden Rule. A rule that says no Supreme Court nomination will be confirmed in a presidential election year… and who came up with this rule? None other than Democrat Vice President Joe Biden. But again, somehow this is the GOP’s fault. Ridiculous.

Watch the insanity for yourself.

I’ve delivered a few hundred of these weekly addresses over the years.  And you may have noticed a theme that pops up pretty often:

The Republicans who run this Congress aren’t doing their jobs.

Well, guess what?  Congress recently returned from a seven-week vacation.  They’ve only got two weeks left until their next one.  But there’s a lot of business they need to get done first.

First – even as we’re seeing more and more Zika cases inside the United States, they’ve refused to fund our efforts to protect women and children by fighting Zika in a serious way.

Second – they still need to provide resources to help the people of Louisiana recover from last month’s terrible floods, and to help communities like Flint recover from their own challenges.

Third – they have made Merrick Garland, a Supreme Court nominee with more federal judicial experience than any other in history, wait longer than any other in history for the simple courtesy of a hearing, let alone a vote.  All because they want their nominee for President to fill that seat.

There are plenty other bipartisan priorities they should finish this year, too.  Passing criminal justice reform.  Attacking the opioids epidemic.  Funding Joe Biden’s cancer moonshot.  Finishing a Trans-Pacific trade agreement that will support American jobs and boost American wages.  And passing a budget that will make sure all of America’s priorities are funded without resorting to shutdown threats and last-minute gimmicks. 

By the way, it’s been almost a decade since Congress voted to raise the minimum wage.  I’m just saying.

None of this should be controversial.  All of it is within our reach.  This is America – we can do anything.  We just need a Congress that works as hard as you do.  At the very least, we should expect that they do their jobs – and protect us from disease, help us recover from disaster, keep the Supreme Court above politics, and help our businesses grow and hire.

So if any of these priorities matter to you, let your Congressperson know.  And if they still refuse to do their jobs – well, you know what to do in November. 

Our government only works as well as the people we elect.  And that’s entirely up to you.

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