Hurricane Harvey Cartoon Explains what the Media Really Thinks of Christians, Conservatives, and Texans

Politico made a very big mistake on Wednesday when they decided to publish what may be one of the most bigoted, unAmerican, and despicable political cartoons published in recent memory.

Let’s start with the cartoon itself so that you can get a sense of what the liberal media actually thinks about people like us:

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That image really has it all, doesn’t it?

This was published by the mainstream “news” publishers at Politico on a day when people were still getting rescued by the Coast Guard and by their neighbors.

Confederate flag? Check. Gadsden Flag? Check. Hillbilly redneck? Check. Texas Secession sign? Check. Mocking Christianity while praising government? Check.

This cartoon ticks all of the leftwing boxes, doesn’t it?

Meanwhile, it ignores the fact that the vast majority of people saved during and after the storm were rescued by friends, neighbors, and fellow citizens. (That’s the small government way, if you’re keeping score.) Then the government actually told those heroic citizens to STOP saving their neighbors. It also ignores the fact that conservatives have never said that there is no place for government in a situation like this, in fact, this is one of the actual functions the government is supposed to take care of. Finally, it ignores the reality of a Sovereign God who “works in mysterious ways” and as the Bible teaches uses believers and non-believers alike to accomplish His Will.

Politico eventually realized their mistake and deleted the Tweet… but they kept the cartoon on their website.

The artist also tried to deflect the backlash from his bigoted cartoon by claiming it was just about secessionists:

But that answer is BS.

Even the liberal Washington Post thinks the cartoon was way over the line:

The first problem with the cartoon is it’s crassness. People are still being saved, and it’s making fun of those same people.

The second problem is the stereotypes. It’s almost a caricature of what you’d expect a liberal cartoonist to draw in response to conservative Texans relying upon the government in their time of crisis. The Confederate flag T-shirt. The Gadsden Flag. The reference to being saved by God (which seems extremely dismissive of Christianity). The Texas secession banner. It’s all kind of … predictable? …

But the cartoon suggests that normal people who believe in small government should essentially forfeit government help in their time of need — or, at least, that they should suddenly recognize that their belief in smaller government is wrongheaded. It’s all very smug, and it gives extremely short shrift to very complex issues.

To make matters worse, the cartoon just isn’t very good. It’s ham-fisted and un-nuanced, there is nothing to think about as HotAir’s Ed Morrissey points out.

If you want a good analysis of what is taking place in Texas created by a political cartoonist with actual talent, look no further than Michael Ramirez:

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