North Korea

North Korean Threats Hits Home in Seoul as Residents Prepare for…

Kim Jong Un has been somewhat quiet over the course of the last few days, but that hasn’t stopped his southerly neighbors from preparing for the worst.

The diminutive despot has been a constant thorn in the side of South Korea for as long as he has been in the international spotlight, thanks to generations of despicable leadership within the DPRK.

The sheer proximity between North Korea’s military installments and the South Korean capital of Seoul has been a cause for concern that exacerbates itself in times of particular unrest among Kim Jong Un’s mental state, such as now.  While much of Kim’s rhetoric has been aimed at the United States and its Commander in Chief, there is little doubt that the incredibly unhinged “supreme” leader would lash out at a more domestic target should a wild hair appear somewhere near his backside.  With South Koreans relying heavily on the U.S. for support in times of trouble with their northern counterparts, Seoul is on high alert.

Of foremost concern is North Korea’s probable ability to strike the sovereign nation to their south with a nuclear weapon.  Given Kim’s limited success with missile launches, however, it seems almost more likely that the deranged dictator would attempt something a bit less exact, but nonetheless effective:  An electro magnetic pulse attack.

“SOUTH Korea fears Kim Jong-un may order a devastating electromagnetic pulse attack aimed at destroying the country’s financial infrastructure.

“It is also worried North Korea may even target an EMP strike on its nuclear power stations, airlines and government ministries.

“An EMP attack – either sparked by a nuclear blast or a pulse weapon  – would quickly bring the South’s financial institutions to their knees.

“Now the national banks are looking into establishing data centres overseas, The Korea Herald reported.

“Others are looking to build reinforced repositories designed to withstand the blast of a powerful EMP weapon.

“Electronic equipment exposed to an electromagnetic pulse can experience damaging current and voltage surges, while data stored electronically can be corrupted.

“‘Current regulations prohibit the transfer of client information overseas, so we are discussing ways to revise those rules so we can set up data back-up centers abroad’, a financial official told the newspaper.”

EMP attacks have long been a concern of the international community, as it pertains to North Korea, given the less-than-cutting-edge technology needed to successfully incapacitate an entire region of the planet.

Such an attack would render nearly all South Korean electronics useless for an extended period of time, not only crippling the aforementioned banks, but communications, newer vehicles, household appliances, and medical equipment.

 

Please leave your comments below