News You Can Use for June 26, 2017

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Good Morning! We here at Constitution.com want you to get your day started right, which is why we’ve decided to help you catch the morning’s news highlights. We know that you’ve got a busy day ahead and you may not necessarily have time to surf the web looking for the things you need to know, so we’ve gone ahead and done that for you.

We’ve gathered a short list of some of what we think are the most important headlines of the day and placed them all right here for you.

So without further ado, here’s the News you can Use for Monday, June 26, 2017.

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Conservative Republicans and Liberal Democrats agree that the Senate healthcare vote should not happen this week, and instead should be pushed back to allow time for debate and changes to the bill.

John McEnroe explains, in his indomitable style, why Serena Williams is NOT the best tennis player in the world. “Uh, she’s not, you mean, the best player in the world, period? … Well because if she was in, if she played the men’s circuit she’d be like 700 in the world.”

Ivanka Trump has been ordered to testify in a trademark infringement lawsuit involving one of her company’s shoe designs.

Corrupt New York Democrats just gave a six-figure job to a woman who is too fat and too sick to actually do the job.

The Washington Post is lying… again. FCC chairman Ajit Pai’s staff blasted the liberal newspaper for running a story about Pai that was a complete “fabrication.” Pai’s staff also argued that the Post’s allegations were easily disprovable before wondering if the reporters at the paper did any “fact-checking” before running their stories.

A civil council in Raqqa, Syria has pardoned 83 low-ranking ISIS militants in an effort to promote stability in their city now that it seems clear that ISIS’ hold on the region is coming to an end.

California announced plans to pass a single payer healthcare system this year… but now they’ve reconsidered because they learned that such a plan would cost TWICE their current state budget.

The Supreme Court is KILLING the 5th Amendment.

The GOP Senate Health Care bill is not great, it’s not even good… but it’s way better than Obamacare.

Senator Pat Toomey (R-PA) explains that the Senate bill “fixes” Obamacare’s failures while preserving the safety net. What Toomey means is that he thinks a little socialism is okay.

Johnny Depp is lucky he’s a Democrat, or he’d never work in Hollywood again.

The Washington firm behind the “Trump dossier” is stonewalling Congress and attempting to hide their connections to the Democrat Party.

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I am the supreme law of the United States. Originally comprising seven articles, I delineate the national frame of government. My first three articles entrench the doctrine of the separation of powers, whereby the federal government is divided into three branches: the legislative, consisting of the bicameral Congress; the executive, consisting of the President; and the judicial, consisting of the Supreme Court and other federal courts. Articles Four, Five and Six entrench concepts of federalism, describing the rights and responsibilities of state governments and of the states in relationship to the federal government. Article Seven establishes the procedure subsequently used by the thirteen States to ratify it. I am regarded as the oldest written and codified constitution in force of the world.

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