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New Threat Emerges in The Wake Of Hurricane Harvey: ALLIGATORS

Texas has been in the hearts of all Americans this week, as the Lone Star State continues to suffer the effects of the nation’s most powerful hurricane in decades, if not longer.

Hurricane Harvey made landfall late last Friday night off of the Gulf Coast of Texas, near the city of Corpus Christi.  As the powerful category 4 storm continued to fade over land, the precipitation band stalled out over the metropolitan Houston area, deluging the city, flooding its streets, and overwhelming its reservoirs and levees.  The city is still facing continued threats from this precipitation as dams and lakes stress and crest, creating the very real possibility of a second wave of destruction in the coming days.

Furthermore, some of the city’s less reputable inhabitants have taken to the streets to pillage and plunder, with looters openly attacking citizens and rescue personnel alike in their quest for televisions and other needless material things.

Even news crews are catching flack for their horrifically tone deaf and intrusive coverage of the victims of this tremendous tragedy, with CNN, of course, being at the forefront of this amoral push to sell advertising space on their network.

Now, however, a new threat is coming to light as one entrepreneur in southeast Texas is attempting to take inventory of his stock.

“The owners of the largest alligator adventure park in southeast Texas says that more than 350 of their alligators have escaped and are outside of the sanctuary because of Hurricane Harvey-related flooding. There are other reptiles loose within the facility.

“’Gator Country Adventure Park,’ in Beaumont on FM 365 houses over 450 American alligators, crocodiles, venomous snakes, and other reptiles.

“The photo on their website home page shows the owners, Arlie Hammonds and Gary Saurage with ‘Big Tex.’

“Fox 4 covers southeast Texas and they interviewed Saurage on Monday. He told KFDM Fox 4 reporter James Ware that he has not seen flooding like this over the last 12 years.

“’We’re less than a foot from (water) going over the fences,’ Saurage said. ‘All of these are certified, high fences, but when it won’t quit, it won’t quit. We’ve worked around the clock and I don’t know what else to do. We’re truly tired. Everybody’s at the end of it, man. We don’t know what to do.'”

While natural disasters almost always carry with them a burden for the animals in the lives of those affected, the situation in southeast Texas is certainly a unique one.

 

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