Monsanto

Monsanto Now BRIBING Farmers To Use Knowingly Harmful Pesticide

If you are searching for the quintessential evil archetype of corporate greed, you needn’t look any further than Big Agriculture powerhouse Monsanto.

The enormous, yet somehow not a monopoly corporation has been holding American farmers hostage for decades with their ridiculous tactics and antics.

Farmers in the United States have a difficult time finding seeds that aren’t made by Monsanto, and the cost of using such products would certainly effect the bottom line of these American small business owners.  And, not only are they being essentially forced to purchase seeds from one company, they are prohibited from stockpiling seeds from season to season due to Monsanto’s legal arrangement with these farmers and, in the case of certain products, genetic modification that produces no offspring in the season’s crop.

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Now, as a number of Monsanto’s chemicals are finding themselves under enhanced scrutiny for their dangerous contents, the massive corporation is being forced to bribe farmers into using their pesticides.

“Monsanto Co will give cash back to U.S. farmers who buy a weed killer that has been linked to widespread crop damage, offering an incentive to apply its product even as regulators in several U.S. states weigh restrictions on its use.

“The incentive to use XtendiMax with VaporGrip, a herbicide based on a chemical known as dicamba, could refund farmers over half the sticker price of the product in 2018 if they spray it on soybeans Monsanto engineered to resist the weed killer, according to company data.

“The United States faced an agricultural crisis this year caused by new formulations of dicamba-based herbicides, which farmers and weed experts say harmed crops because they evaporated and drifted away from where they were sprayed.

“Monsanto’s cash-back offer comes as federal and state regulators are requiring training for farmers who plan to spray dicamba in 2018 and limiting when it can be used. Weed specialists say the restrictions make the chemical more costly and inconvenient to apply, but Monsanto’s incentive could help convince farmers to use it anyway.”

As if the idea that Monsanto’s pesticide monopolization wasn’t bad enough, we have to remember that these chemicals are constantly invading the American food chain in new and unique ways.

It is nearly impossible to purchase any sort of food in the United States in which Monsanto hasn’t had a hand.  Now, not only are finding ourselves concerned with the quality of the crops themselves, but the regulation-skirting toxic salad dressing that Monsanto is bribing farmers to use as well.

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