marijuana

Maine Lawmakers Threaten to Override Governor’s Ganja Veto

It’s time for a lot of America to wake up to the fact that you don’t have to like smoking marijuana to like legal marijuana.

This isn’t about getting high…not in the slightest.  This is about freedom.  This is about taking the medicinal monopoly out of the hands of the addictive-on-purpose pharmaceutical industry.  This is about allowing our nation to grow a cash crop that could transform our entire economy.

Weed isn’t for everyone, but prosperity could be.

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Just take a look at Colorado, whose legal weed sales drove a tax surplus of epic proportions.

Colorado schools are about to see a massive improvement in programming and infrastructure, thanks to Proposition BB. The Prop, which was passed in November of last year, allows the state to keep excess funds from marijuana tax revenue. As it currently stands, the fund contains $66 million.

One of the programs funded by Prop BB is an anti-bullying campaign throughout Colorado schools. As stated by the Colorado Department of Education (CDE), each school will be offered a $40,000 grant to hire specialized bullying prevention coaches and form anti-bullying coalitions, among other solutions.

“It’s a lot of money,” said Dr. Adam Collins, bullying prevention and education grant coordinator for the CDE, “It’s a great opportunity for schools to apply and make sure the social and emotional wellness of their students is taken care of.”

Nationwide – this could be a bonafide gold rush.

That’s the wind that Maine lawmakers are hoping to harness this week, as they attempt to push a marijuana legalization bill past a living-in-the-50’s governor.

Lawmakers in Maine are confident they have the votes to override a likely veto by Gov. Paul LePage (R) on a bill legalizing recreational marijuana.

The state Senate on Tuesday passed the bill in a concurrence vote of 25-10; the House also approved it last week by a veto-proof margin. Legislators in the House believe their bloc of support for the bill will hold if the governor follows through on his promise to use a veto, according to the Portland Press Herald.

LePage has said he will strike down the bill over concerns that legalizing an adult-use marijuana program would create a second set of regulations and taxes on the substance in addition to the state’s existing medical marijuana program.

LePage has 10 days left to decide on the bill, which would likely allow the state to issue recreational marijuana licenses for businesses in the spring of next year.

Maine legislators estimate that the state could receive up to $85 million in marijuana tax revenue in their first year of legalization, at 20% tax.  This rate would be the lowest in the nation, mimicking the numbers out in Oregon.

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