Hypocrite Media Ignores Democrat’s Violence and Arrest

If you’ve been paying any attention at all you may have noticed that offer the last day the media has been talking an awful lot about the Congressional race in Montana.

It’s a special election and an important one, but the media has focused on that race simply because the Republican candidate there got too aggressive with a belligerent reporter and “body slammed” him. Not a good move for anyone running for office, particularly in this close race for an important seat in Congress.

However, the media’s bias has shined through as the situation has been all they’ve been able to discuss for the last 18 hours or so.

Which is odd, because when a similar situation unfolded just last week, but with a Democrat, the national media was almost completely silent.

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Mark Wicklund is a Democrat who ran for Congress in 2016 and had plans for running against the man who defeated him again in 2018, now those plans are likely on hold.

From the Herald and Review:

Mark Wicklund, a former Macon County Board member and Democratic candidate for the 13th District U.S. House seat, is facing charges after police said he crashed a vehicle while driving under the influence and subsequently struck an officer at the hospital.

Wicklund has been charged with DUI in the April 18 rollover vehicle crash and is free on $10,000 bond.

He also faces a preliminary charge of aggravated battery against a police officer, with a special prosecutor having 30 days to determine whether to file a formal charge…

Wicklund apparently got drunk while playing golf at the local country club. He then climbed into his car and proceeded to get into an accident on his way home. After he was rescued and taken to a local hospital, Wicklund made things even worse for himself by becoming belligerent and punching a police officer.

At the hospital, “Mark was cussing, screaming and shouting profanities towards officers and medical staff,” Kaufman wrote, adding that he appeared to be “heavily intoxicated, with bloodshot, glassy eyes.”

When Kaufman told him he was not free to leave, he made a move toward the exit and the officer placed his hand on his chest to prevent him from leaving.

“I advised Mark that he was going to be placed in restraints, since he continuously ignored my lawful orders,” Kaufman wrote. After Wicklund tried again to leave the emergency room, the officer grabbed his wrist “to secure him to the hospital bed.”

After a short struggle, “Mark quickly and forcefully swung his right arm backwards, striking me in the chest,” Kaufman wrote. Another officer arrived at the hospital and Wicklund was placed in restraints.

So. Did you hear about this story on the national news?

Wicklund just ran for an open seat in Congress, and was planning to run again in 2018. Unlike the GOP candidate, Wicklund is likely to face a serious penalty for his drunk driving and his decision to attack a police officer. In fact, there’s every reason to think that the story in Illinois would likely be juicer and of more importance nationally than the story in Montana… and yet, the media fixated on the GOP candidate “body slamming” an annoying reporter as opposed to the Democrats driving drunk, and attacking a police officer. Weird, right? Or just another example of the media bias that Republicans face every day?

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