marijuana

Florida’s Wacky Cannabis Laws Get SMACKDOWN in Court

Whether you’re a fan of Cheech and Chong or not, there is undeniably overwhelming evidence that the legalization of marijuana could cause a massive economic windfall to our nation.

Think about it.  Who farms better than Americans?  No one, that’s who.  If we were to make marijuana and hemp both perfectly legal, our nation would return to near full productivity.  The sheer usefulness of the two plants would dictate their worth, which dictates what the industry’s jobs would pay, which then dictates the GDP of the nation, the states, the counties, and your household.

It’s a gold rush for farmland, and we’re sitting on our hands because Big Pharma has massive swaths of the nation addicted to chewable heroin.

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Now, at least we have an instance of common sense coming to us from, of all places, Florida.

Florida’s ban that prevents medical marijuana patients from smoking their cannabis has gone up in smoke.

Leon County Circuit Court Judge Karen Gievers on Friday ruled that a state’s ban on smokable cannabis is unconstitutional. Florida’s Department of Health said in a statement it has appealed the ruling, which will impose an automatic stay.

Gievers wrote in her 22-page ruling that Floridians “have the right to use the form of medical marijuana for treatment of their debilitating medical conditions as recommended by their certified physicians, including the use of smokable marijuana in private places.”

Similarly restrictive laws around the nation have had parents skirting the law in order to treat the illness of their children.

“March 7, I began illegally treating my son with cannabis oil,” said Dale Jackson, medical cannabis advocate.

Georgians willing to break the law in the fight for medical cannabis are making their voices heard this 2017 legislative session.

“I’m never going to be cured but I can have a decent quality of life and feel like a human being again,” said Angie Simons, medical cannabis advocate.

Simons, who has lupus, and Stanley Atkins, a veteran who deals with constant pain, are among fighting against these laws.

“I describe it as a filet knife, not very wide but long, piercing through your liver through your diaphragm and into your gallbladder,” Atkins said.

While Florida can certainly be considered a wacky place at times thanks to Key West’s eccentric residents, the myths about the Skunk Ape, and whatever they do down on the Redneck Riviera, it seems that they can finally scratch this embarrassment off the list.

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