Fifteen Incredible Statistics from 2017 You Need to Know

A lot of things happened last year, but with the media circus so constantly drumming up fake news or dwelling on inanities, you may have missed some of the really important facts that emerged from 2017.

So, here are 15 important statistics that you may have missed.

(In no particular order)

#1: We found out in 2017 that the final bill for Obama’s regulations in the last days of his presidency topped 5.8 billion dollars! Obama came to office claiming that he would cut regulations. It was one of his biggest lies. In fact, in the final two weeks of his destructive, economy-killing regime he pushed through that nearly $6 billion in new regulations.

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#2: On the other hand, that regulatory burden took a dramatic move in the opposite direction once Donald Trump took office. According to the Washington Examiner, Obama’s first 100 days in office cost America 141 times more than Trump’s. The regulations proposed by the Trump administration totaled in at $28 million compared to Obama’s $4 billion.

#3: When Donald Trump entered office in January, the U.S. was 20 trillion dollars in debt. Contrast that with the one trillion in debt the U.S. faced on Reagan’s first day in office in 1980.

#4: Over a million U.S. workers got a bonus and/or a raise at the end of 2017, all thanks to the national exuberance over Trump’s soaring economy and his economic policies.

#5: The Dow Industrial Average broke 25,000 for the first time in history. The S&P 500 and Nasdaq composite also hit record highs.

#6: Unemployment for African Americans and Hispanics hit amazing lows in 2017, with Hispanic unemployment at 4.9 percent and black unemployment at 5.7 percent. It was once considered “full employment” if unemployment rates were at 5 percent, so these numbers are amazing.

#7: The Trump administration got rid of 16,000 federal employees in his first 11 months as president. Many thousands more are to come in 2018. This is a cause for celebration.

#8: In less than ten months, ISIS lost 98 percent of the territory it gained under the lackadaisical Obama regime.

#9: By the end of the year, wildfires had charred 9,791,062 acres of land mostly in the western U.S.

#10: California has become the worst state for education in the nation with less than half its children in third, fourth, and fifth grades able to meet the state’s minimum standards for literacy.

#11: Thanks to Obamacare, an appendectomy is ten times more expensive in the United States than it is in Mexico.

#12: In the early 1970s, 70 percent of all men in the United States from the age of 20 to the age of 39 were married, but today that number has fallen to just 35 percent. Instead of getting married and starting families, a lot of our young men are still living at home with their parents. Today, 35 percent of all young men from the age of 21 to the age of 30 “are living at home with their parents or a close relative.”

#13: The 2017 summer movie season was the worst loser for Hollywood in a decade. At $3.8 billion in ticket sales, it is the worst take since 2006 ($3.7 billion) and is down 6.5 percent over the 2016 summer take.

#14: Hollywood’s Summer bummer was followed by the worst October bloodbath since 2007. The $531.1 million box office take in October was down 13.4 percent over 2016. Not a single U.S. movie earned $100 million or more in October.

#15: There was a dramatic drop in police officer deaths in 2017 with the second fewest in 50 years, according to US News. 128 police officers died on the job in 2017 with 44 shot and killed. This is a ten percent decrease over 2016 and the lowest since 2013’s 113 officers killed.

Of course there are many thousands more important statistics than these few, but for sure you haven’t heard much about even what I just presented, have you?

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