ESPN

ESPN and NFL in Same Liberal Ratings Debacle, Divorce Imminent?

If you are looking for a surefire way to devalue the entertainment that you provide to the American people, team up with the liberal left and help float their ideology on your platform.

So far this tactic has worked wonders for ESPN and the NFL, two has-been bastions of the U.S. sports world who have recently aligned themselves with democratic ideals.

In the case of ESPN, their pivot to politics has created an ugly rift between the network and their fans beginning with their ridiculous termination of baseball legend and commentator Curt Schilling, who was removed from the network for his personal Twitter opinion on gender neutral bathrooms.  This kicked off a left-leaning epiphany at the network that has caused ESPN to fall horribly in the ratings and stimulated a number of cost saving measures including massive layoffs. 

The NFL’s plight has been slightly more public, as a great number of their overpaid, child-like “athletes” have denounced the American law enforcement community while simultaneously disparaging our military members by kneeling during the National Anthem.  While widely believed to account for nothing more than a publicity stunt for many pro ballers looking to make headlines, the gestures have led the NFL to horrid ratings and empty stadiums as Americans denounce the league’s unwillingness to curb such disrespectful behavior.

Now, this match made in liberal heaven may be divorcing from one another as their collective ship continues to sink.

“With so much of ESPN’s universe asunder, it’s not outlandish now to entertain a previously unthinkable prospect: Might ESPN elect to go without rights to NFL games after the expiration of its eight-year deal for Monday Night Football in 2021?!

​“’Impossible’? Yeah, we know — NFL games have been the backbone of ESPN’s existence since 1987, and the biggest, most critical element of its financial dominance ever since. The network basically can’t exist without an NFL rights package.

​”Well, think again — like some execs at the network have started to do — and consider the following:

“First, quietly, ESPN has been able to pull off a dramatic judo move in recent agreements with its affiliates, one whose importance cannot be overstated: There is no longer specific contract language that requires the cable giant to have NFL games in order to earn its lofty (and industry-envied) subscriber fees, currently more than $7 per household. This means the network would not face automatic decreases in that vital artery of its dual revenue stream. Sure, distributors would be aghast, demanding to negotiate lower fees probably immediately, but the point is, there would be negotiations, enabling ESPN to do everything it could to keep those numbers as high as possible.

“​Second, when ESPN agreed to pay $15.2 billion for its current Monday Night Football deal, some of its key executives believed they were buying the schedule of the previous MNF package, i.e., more often than not, the best game or at least one of the top games of the week. But Sunday Night Football got that pedigree, and Fox and CBS games since then have also generally been more desirable than ESPN’s matchups. With the advent of Thursday Night Football several years ago, ESPN’s Monday night schedule has been further diluted of quality matchups, and the network hasn’t been shy about voicing dissatisfaction. “

Sure, the proposition seems ultimately unlikely, but definitely not out of the question especially given both entities’ overwhelming commitment to the almighty dollar.

ESPN and the NFL are certainly failing, not only in business, but in the eyes of many Americans who believe in the unity of our nation, and who hope for an end to these pedantic and divisive politics invading our Monday night football reprieve.

 

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