taxes

Delinquent Taxpayers Will Soon Become Political Prisoners of The IRS

Americans have, for literally their entire existence, been wholly opposed to the idea that the government could use taxes to subdue its people.

This was, of course, the very impetus of the nation to begin with.  The Boston Tea Party – the primordial ooze from which these United States crawled – was explicitly a demonstration against the brutish tax burden that the colonists endured under British rule.  We quickly went from making a whole lot of tea in a harbor to telling the Redcoats where to shove it all in the name of having a fair and honest system of taxation.

Since then, there have been no shortage of adjustments made to our grandiose tax code, and no shortage of repairs for those adjustments either.

One of the most despicable uses of the tax code, however, came to us from the relatively recent terms of former President Barack Hussein Obama.

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In the disastrous democrat’s infamous “Affordable Care Act”, the mandate to purchase health insurance was decreed Obama, guaranteeing his good buddies in both the Big Pharmaceutical industry and the insurance industry plenty of profits for some time to come.

In order to enforce this unconstitutional mandate, Obama held Americans hostage via their taxes, installing an increasing penalty for non-compliance every year when it was time to see the tax man. The penalty was designed to hit Americans in their wallets – something that certainly seems counterintuitive to those who already could not afford coverage.

Now, it looks as though the IRS will once again be called into action in order to hold Americans hostage, this time imprisoning delinquent taxpayers within the confines of America itself.

“Americans who are behind on their taxes could be denied a passport, or even have theirs revoked, unless they enter into a payment agreement — a radical step that forms part of a crackdown on delinquent tax debt legislated by Congress.

“The IRS announced last month that it is beginning implementation of procedures aimed at cracking down on those with ‘seriously delinquent tax debts.’

“It defines that as someone owing more than $51,000 in back taxes, penalties and interest, for which the agency has issued a levy or filed a notice and the period to challenge has expired.

“The procedures stem from the 2015 Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act, which requires the IRS to inform the State Department of those who are seriously delinquent. In turn, the State Department is required to deny the application for or the renewal of a passport.”

On the surface, this is designed to appear rather mundane:  Don’t pay taxes, don’t travel.

But there is no doubt that the system is also an insurance policy that the government has against the possibility of rebellion or revolution.

If We The People were to one day rise up and decide that our government was in need of replacement, one of the most logical first steps would be an immediate “stop payment” on income tax by citizens.  It would be simple, with Americans simply going to their HR department and revising their W4 forms.

Now, a government that sniffs out this threat can literally imprison its own people in-country, disallowing international travel by non-compliant citizens.

 

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