When Cotton and Pumpkins became Innately Racist

Pumpkins and cotton stalks are triggering some black people. Today’s blacks have come a long way, but not in the way you think.

Their ancestors endured kidnapping at the hands of their own people, shackles, torturous cargo ships, whips, defacement, the forced breakup of the family, forced labor, lynching, Jim Crow laws, separate water fountains and bathroom facilities, and other demeaning actions.

There’s one thing I know. Previous generations of blacks would never have been triggered by pumpkins and cotton stalks. If today’s young blacks want to be triggered by something, they should be triggered by how the government has used them for political gain at their expense. Walter Williams writes:

That the problems of today’s black Americans are a result of a legacy of slavery, racial discrimination and poverty has achieved an axiomatic status, thought to be self-evident and beyond question. This is what academics and the civil rights establishment have taught. But as with so much of what’s claimed by leftists, there is little evidence to support it.

The No. 1 problem among blacks is the effects stemming from a very weak family structure. Children from fatherless homes are likelier to drop out of high school, die by suicide, have behavioral disorders, join gangs, commit crimes and end up in prison. They are also likelier to live in poverty-stricken households. But is the weak black family a legacy of slavery? In 1960, just 22 percent of black children were raised in single-parent families. Fifty years later, more than 70 percent of black children were raised in single-parent families. Here’s my question: Was the increase in single-parent black families after 1960 a legacy of slavery, or might it be a legacy of the welfare state ushered in by the War on Poverty?

Williams’ entire article is worth reading. If you disagree with Williams’ assessment if you’re black, you are labeled a black white supremacist. That’s right. Ben Carson, the former Director of Pediatric Neurosurgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital and the current Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, Stacey Dash, and former Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke are “black white supremacists.”

We know everything is racist, and if you deny this truth, then you are, by definition, a racist. Once you start losing an argument, the only option left is to play the race card. But when the race card is played too much, it loses its effectiveness. Now that everything is racist, it means nothing is racist. We have been inoculated with charges of racism for so long that an immunity has set in. The charge of racism is now meaningless and ineffective.

This is bigotry and racism:

“A volunteer firefighter in Ohio who wrote on Facebook that he would save a dog before saving a black person from a burning building, because to him, ‘one dog is more important than a million n*****s.’” (The Blaze)

Notice the difference when compared to pumpkins and cotton stalks?

 

Read the Rest of the Story at GaryDeMar.com

Gary DeMar

Gary DeMar was raised in the suburbs of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He is a graduate of Western Michigan University (1973) and Reformed Theological Seminary (1979). He has served as researcher and writer at the Christian Worldview ministry American Vision since 1980 and President since 1984. Today he serves as Senior Fellow at American Vision where he lectures, researches, and writes on various worldview issues.
Gary is the author of 30 books on a variety of topics – from “America’s Christian History” and “God and Government” to “Thinking Straight in a Crooked World” to “Last Days Madness.”
Gary has been interviewed by Time magazine, CNN, MSNBC, FOX, the BBC, and Sean Hannity. He has done numerous radio and television interviews, including the “Bible Answer Man,” hosted by Hank Hanegraaff and “Today’s Issues” with Tim Wildmon and Marvin Sanders. Newspaper interviews with Gary have appeared in the Washington Times, Toledo (Ohio) Blade, the Sacramento Bee, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Marietta Daily Journal, San Francisco Chronicle, The Orlando Sentinel, and the Chicago Tribune.

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