Justin Trudeau

Canada’s Prime Minister Stabs the USA in the Back

We’ve long-since established the fact that Canada’s Prime Minister isn’t the brightest bulb, but now we know that he’s also a grandstanding charlatan.

He recently attended the G7 conference with other world leaders, including our President, Donald Trump, where he seems to have told two different stories about trade. With Trump’s team Prime Minister Trudeau had one discussion, but with the gathered media after the conference he told a completely different story of our trade state of affairs.

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The President’s economic advisor, Larry Kudlow explained to CNN’s Jake Tapper exactly what took place and how Justin Trudeau maliciously stabbed President Trump in the back.

TAPPER: But let’s start with this unprecedented decision from the president to not endorse the communique that you had been negotiating.

Was this the plan all along, or was this completely a reaction to Justin Trudeau, the Canadian prime minister?

KUDLOW: Completely a reaction. I appreciate you putting that out there.

Look, we went there. All the punditry was saying, A, President Trump might not even go to G7, B, we will never sign a communique because, C, we’re not going to work with other people.

Well, we did in good faith. I personally negotiated with Prime Minister Trudeau, who, by the way, I basically liked working with, but not until this sophomoric play.

I mean, we went through it. We agreed. We compromised on the communique. We joined the communique in good faith.

TAPPER: But what did he say that was so offensive? President Trump accused him of lying.

KUDLOW: Well, he holds a press conference, and he said the U.S. is insulting. He said that Canada has to stand up for itself. He says that we are the problem with tariffs.

Well, the infactual, the non-factual part of this was, they have enormous tariffs. I mean, they have tariffs on certain dairy and food products of 290, 295 percent. He was polarizing.

I mean, here’s the thing. I mean, he really kind of stabbed us in the back. He really, actually — you know what? He did a great disservice to the whole G7. He betrayed…

TAPPER: Trudeau did?

KUDLOW: Yes, he did, because they were united in the G7. They came together.

And I was there extensively. I was involved in these late-night negotiations. President Trump was charming, good faith.

I — I was in the bilateral meeting with Trudeau and President Trump. And they were getting along famously. President Trump actually — and this is music to my ears, Jake. He went through those two days of conference talking about the need for a new free trade system, no tariffs.

TAPPER: Right.

KUDLOW: No tariff barriers.

TAPPER: No subsidies.

KUDLOW: No subsidies.

He is a trade reformer, as I have argued again and again. And he put that out.

And so they had this bilateral meeting. We were very close to making a deal with Canada on NAFTA, bilaterally perhaps. And then we leave, and Trudeau pulls this sophomoric political stunt for domestic consumption.

It pains me…

TAPPER: Let’s look at the language — yes, let’s look at the language of the communique that you helped negotiate, that President Trump walked away from.

Here is the part that is on trade, which is the part that, obviously, I think President Trump is most interested in.

KUDLOW: Yes. Yes.

TAPPER: “We acknowledge that free, fair and mutually beneficial trade and investment, while creating reciprocal benefits, are key engines for growth and job creation. We strive to reduce tariff barriers, non-tariff barriers and subsidies. We call for the start of negotiations this year to develop stronger international rules on market-distorting industrial subsidies and trade-distorting actions by state-owned enterprises.”

That is what President Trump believes in.

KUDLOW: Yes.

TAPPER: Why walk away from it just because of something Justin Trudeau said for domestic consumption?

KUDLOW: No, not something.

Look, you — yes, for domestic political consumption. But it was a global statement. The whole world listened to what he said.

Look, you’re reporting it here in Washington, as you must…

You just don’t behave that way, OK? It is a betrayal, OK? He is essentially double-crossing — not just double crossing President Trump, but the other members of the G7, who were working together and pulling together this communique.

You know, you never get everything you want. There are compromises along the way. President Trump played that process in good faith.

So, I ask you, he gets up in the airplane and leaves. And then Trudeau starts blasting him in a domestic news conference? I’m sorry. It is a betrayal. That is a double-cross.

It pains me because I like Trudeau. I was working with him. We were together putting words on paper. I’m changing “the”s to “a”s when it comes to reforming the international system. They all agreed. This is so important.

It wasn’t just Kudlow complaining about Trudeau’s self-serving antics. Another of the President’s chief economic advisors, Peter Navarro was even more upset by the lies being peddled by the Canadian leader, arguing that there was “a special place in hell” for leaders like Trudeau.

Peter Navarro: Chris, there’s a special place in hell for any foreign leader that engages in bad faith diplomacy with President Donald J. Trump and then tries to stab him in the back on the way out the door. And that’s what bad faith Justin Trudeau did with that stunt press conference. That’s what week, dishonest Justin Trudeau did. And that comes right from Air Force One.

And I’ll tell you this, to my friends in Canada, that was one of the worst political miscalculations of a Canadian leader in modern Canadian history. All Justin Trudeau had to do was take the win. President Trump did the courtesy to Justin Trudeau to travel up to Quebec for that summit. He had other things, bigger things on his plate in Singapore, where you are now, Chris. He did him a favor and he was even willing to sign that socialist communique. And what did Trudeau did — do as soon as — as soon as the plane took off from Canadian airspace, Trudeau stuck our president in the back. That will not stand.

And as far as this retaliation goes, the American press needs to do a much better job of what the Canadians are getting ready to do because it’s nothing short of an attack on our political system and it’s nothing short of Canada trying to raise its high protectionist barriers even higher on things like maple syrup and other goods.

Chris Wallace: Mr. Navarro, I’ve got a lot to talk to you about, but I do have to press this. You used some very strong words, stab in the back, a special place in hell. You said that that came from Air Force One. Are those the views, are those the words of the president towards Trudeau?

Peter Navarro: Those are my words, but they’re the sentiment that was on Air Force One after that.

Look, Chris, this was — this was just wrong what — what Trudeau is doing. The Canadians are totally bungling our trade relationships and it’s due to their leadership. Take NAFTA for example. We’d have a deal, we’d have a great deal with NAFTA, by now, if the Canadians would spend more time at the bargaining table and less time lobbying Capitol Hill and our press and state governments here, they…

They are just simply not playing fair. Dishonest. Weak.

President Trump himself directly accused Trudeau of lying about what happened.

Onan Coca

Onan is the Editor-in-Chief at Romulus Marketing. He's also the managing editor at Eaglerising.com, Constitution.com and the managing partner at iPatriot.com. Onan is a graduate of Liberty University (2003) and earned his M.Ed. at Western Governors University in 2012. Onan lives in Atlanta with his wife and their three wonderful children. You can find his writing all over the web.

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