How the American People Allowed the Government to Trample the 4th Amendment

Editorial credit: Rena Schild / Shutterstock.com

Over at Fox News on Tuesday evening, Judge Andrew Napolitano sat down with investigative journalist (and victim of illegal government spying) James Rosen to discuss the revelation that our government has been illegally spying on us for years.

While the spying may not necessarily be a surprise for anyone, the scope of the spying on innocent Americans and length of time the lawlessness went unchecked us certainly troubling. Even now the FISA courts remain unconvinced that they’ve actually been told all of the criminal activities, and yet, the spying likely continues.

This story is proof positive that the government cannot properly provide oversight of our intelligence agencies, and that those agencies cannot be trusted to defend our Constitutional rights. It also means that we must strip the NSA (and the other intelligence agencies) of the ability to surveil the American people. Yes, it will make all of our lives a bit more dangerous as the threat of terrorist attacks will increase, but as Americans we must always put our freedom (and the freedom of future generations) before our desire for safety. Moreover, even with these unconstitutional tools the intelligence community has been unable to keep us completely safe and there have been many successful terrorist attacks against our people.

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It’s time to end the government’s ability to spy on innocent Americans. It’s time we demand that our leaders defend our 4th Amendment rights, and if they refuse to do so it will be time that the American people stand up and install a government that will defend those rights. It’s time for America to remember that “Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.”

Constitution.com 🇺🇸

I am the supreme law of the United States. Originally comprising seven articles, I delineate the national frame of government. My first three articles entrench the doctrine of the separation of powers, whereby the federal government is divided into three branches: the legislative, consisting of the bicameral Congress; the executive, consisting of the President; and the judicial, consisting of the Supreme Court and other federal courts. Articles Four, Five and Six entrench concepts of federalism, describing the rights and responsibilities of state governments and of the states in relationship to the federal government. Article Seven establishes the procedure subsequently used by the thirteen States to ratify it. I am regarded as the oldest written and codified constitution in force of the world.

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