Al Sharpton Calls Jeff Sessions a Racist but His Facts are All Wrong

The (not so) Reverend Al Sharpton is actively campaigning against Senator Jeff Sessions (R-AL) as the next Attorney General, and his argument is based on the familiar canard used by so many race-baiting hucksters.

Sharpton argues that Sessions has shown a pattern of racist behavior during his time in public life, and to support his claim he lists several specific examples. However, under greater scrutiny it seems that all of Sharpton’s racially charged stories collapse upon themselves. The dedicated investigators at the Daily Signal recently caught up with Sharpton and allowed him to argue his case for why Sessions should not be confirmed, then they explained why each of his arguments were all wrong….

Let’s just say Sharpton was not pleased at being exposed as a liar and a charlatan.

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