AG Jeff Sessions says Ending Improper Tax Credits to Illegals could Pay for Border Wall

Attorney General Jeff Sessions made an interesting argument when he appeared on ABC’s This Week with George Stephanopoulos on Sunday.

The Attorney General pointed out that while liberals complained about being “forced” to pay for a border wall, the money to do so was already there. For just one example of a way that the wall could be paid for without touching any sacred liberal cows, Sessions pointed out that ending improper tax credits to illegal immigrants (who he said are mostly from Mexico) would save the nation $40 BILLION over the next ten years and that would pay for a healthy portion of the wall.

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“I know there’s $4 billion a year in excess payments, according to the Department of the Treasury’s own inspector general several years ago, that are going to payments to people — tax credits that they shouldn’t get. Now, these are mostly Mexicans. And those kind of things add up — $4 billion a year for 10 years is $40 billion. There are a lot of ways we can find money to help pay for this.”

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Sessions also spoke to the recent uproar over his comments about a judge from some island in the Pacific (Hawaii) being able to singlehandedly stop a legal executive action from the President of the United States.

Sessions told Stephanopoulos that he was joking about the “island in the Pacific” comment, and that liberals today simply can’t take a joke.

“Nobody has a sense of humor anymore,” Sessions told the host.

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