Judge-Ruth-Neely

Wyoming Judge Stands Her Ground Against Attempts at Force Conformity

For many, there is a line that they are not willing to cross. They know where they are willing to go in defense of what they believe. Most of us will come short of losing our jobs and titles. But there are a few that God has granted to stand. Judge Ruth Neely is one of those individuals.

As I reported, Judge Neely stated that she could not preform sodomite unions because of her religious beliefs. And though she has never and should never be faced with such a situation, there was a complaint brought against her.

Neely was given the opportunity to resign and promise never to run for the office of judge, and all charges would be dropped. She refused, choosing rather to face the consequences than to cave to their demands. Now, Neely has had her day in court.

Christian News reports

The Wyoming Supreme Court heard oral argument on Wednesday surrounding a local judge who is under fire for making comment to the media two years ago that, as a Christian, she couldn’t officiate same-sex unions.

On Wednesday, the court heard argument over the matter, as Neely’s attorney asserted that the state “has adopted an extreme position.”

This should make us ask what her thoughts on sodomite unions have to do with her job as a judge. How does this affect her ability to dispense justice in Wyoming?  Is this not just another attempt at forced conformity?

Christian News continues

According to the Associated Press, Patrick Dixon, an attorney for the Commission, said that while Neely has a right to her private beliefs, her statements violate the judicial code of conduct because they demonstrate a bias against homosexuals.

But Neely’s stand proves the very opposite. As I have stated before, without the Law that under girds Neely’s stance, there is no hope for real justice. So while she stands against the sin of Homosexuality, the same Law that condemns that perversion demands justice even for the guilty.

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