border

Will Eminent Domain Complaints Taint Border Wall Construction?

 

The most obnoxious complaints arising from the proposed construction of a wall between the United States and Mexico are coming from the political left.

These disillusioned democratic dunces have for years thrown temper tantrums and hissy fits any politician floats the very idea of enforcing the illegal immigration laws that are already on the books here in America.  Then, when that same politician slips in the possibility of an actual, physical wall on the border, you can virtually see the steam being forcefully ejected from the progressive’s ears.

Now, however, there is a new breed of American dissident as it pertains to completing an actual, brick and mortar structure on our southern border:  Property owners who will be forced to cede land to the literal, actual wall.

“’It’s something that the government wants and the government can take,’ said Noel Benavides, who does not expect to mount a legal challenge. ‘There’s no way to fight it.’

“About a third of the 1,954-mile border between the U.S. and Mexico, in the most populated cities, is already fenced. But here in the valley, where the winding Rio Grande forms a natural dividing line, less than a fifth of the border has fencing.

“The challenges of building a wall in the floodplains of the valley — a hot spot for drug smugglers and for Central American families and unaccompanied children seeking asylum — are immense. Not only does construction near the river present engineering difficulties and potential flood hazards, but many small landowners also have long-standing historic and cultural ties to their property and depend on the river to irrigate their crops.

“Condemnation of riverfront land around the small communities of Roma, Rio Grande City and Los Ebanos has loomed since 2008, when property owners near highly populated sections of the border received official notices from the government.

“About 56 miles of fencing went up, most on levees above the Rio Grande on land the government took through eminent domain. Plans to build another 14 miles were abandoned because an international treaty restricts building in the floodplain, said Scott Nicol, co-chair of the Borderlands Team for the Sierra Club.”

While President Trump’s border wall still has a long procedural and political road ahead of it, landowners on the border can be sure that changes will be coming to their backyards in one form or another as the Commander in Chief continues his work in securing America.

Please leave your comments below