Gang of 8

Is The Gang of Eight Returning? Say It Ain’t So

The latest piece from Politico suggests that The Gang of Eight may soon return.

Lindsey Graham has been one of Trump’s harshest critics. Graham is firmly in the Never Trump camp and earned himself some “street cred” with conservatives when he distanced himself from Trump.  Sadly, in typical Graham style, he’s not opposing Trump because he thinks Trump is not conservative enough. Graham is opposing Trump because he sees this as an opportunity to revive the Gang of Eight. Lindsey Grahamnesty will take Trump’s polling on Latinos and Trump’s past statements on illegal immigration and beat on those incessantly to drum up support for the Gang of Eight.

The Politico piece is quite telling, of course. Obviously Marco Rubio , who is running for his Senate seat again, is staying away from the Gang of Eight and John McCain , who is facing a difficult primary battle, is also running away from the Gang of Eight. However, some  fresh faces in the Senate seem to have warmed up to the Gang of Eight probably because they are not facing re-election.

Sen. Steve Daines (R-Mont.) says he’s interested in bolstering visas for high-skilled workers. Perdue, a former businessman, stressed the need to overhaul the legal immigration system to boost the economy. Sen. Cory Gardner (R-Colo.), who hails from a heavily Latino state, said he’s optimistic there could be a bill-by-bill approach that appeals to both parties.

And Tillis has already worked during his short time in Congress to bolster visas for the seafood industry, a big presence his coastal state. As for those already here illegally, Tillis said population needs to be addressed after criminals are deported and steps are taken to control the border, such as the construction of a “virtual wall” with drones and sensors.

“These are ways to actually build on those successes and then have a dialogue about dealing with the illegally present,” Tillis said. “Under no circumstances should anyone be led to believe that that is just blanket amnesty.”

During the past several months, optimistic immigration advocates have been working away from Washington to try and build a groundswell of support for an overhaul. The National Immigration Forum has organized more than 90 meetings this year, with faith, law enforcement and business officials talking up the need for reform. FWD.us, the pro-immigration reform group led by Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg, hosted several events on the issue in June.

I find it quite shocking to see Senator Perdue’s name being bandied about in regard to Amnesty. Back in January, David Perdue was instrumental in blocking a pro amnesty justice from nomination.

U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson last week said Lopez deserved a hearing, but he has yet to ask the committee for one. But Perdue’s seat on the Judiciary Committee essentially gives him veto power over Isakson if he decides to act.

Perdue said in a statement he became “uncomfortable” with Lopez’s participation with the Georgia Association of Latino Elected Officials after a review of his professional and judicial record.

“I am particularly concerned with his continued participation with this organization and his public comments after he became a state judge,” said Perdue. “Unfortunately, our personal meeting, while cordial and informative, did not fully alleviate my concerns.”

D.A. King from the Dustin Inman Society is a leading activist in Georgia against Amnesty, and recently weighed in on the shocking Politico story.

Politico is reporting Republican Ga Senator David Perdue is willing to help pass another amnesty and to increase legal immigration – which is what big biz wants in order to keep wages low for American workers. Maybe call his DC office and ask what up? 202-224-3521.

Before this Amnesty story from Politico grows wings and starts flying, it’s probably a good idea to follow Mr. D.A. King’s advice and call these Senators who are entertaining the idea of raising Amnesty and the Gang of Eight from the dead.

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