weaker men

WATCH: What to Do about Weaker Men?

A generation of weaker men has now been publicly acknowledged. What’s the solution?

The news is out: younger men are weaker men.

The fact that weaker men are accompanied by stronger women among millennials raises the possibility that our culture has become truly dysfunctional in how we’re raising the sexes, specifically boys (there’s nothing wrong with stronger girls).

Doug French writes in the National Review,

In the age of instant oil change (why entrust your car’s health to your 16-year-old?), ubiquitous lawn services, and on-demand handymen, privileged kids simply don’t have the same, naturally occurring opportunities to learn to work with their hands and to develop physical strength. In the age of zero-tolerance school-disciplinary policies — where any kind of physical confrontation is treated like a human-rights violation — they have less opportunity to develop toughness. Today’s young males don’t have common touchstones for what it’s like to grow up to be a man.

That’s not to say that they don’t still carve out their own, distinctively male spaces — boys and girls are different, after all. But spend time with teen boys today and you’ll find that their common experience revolves more around Call of Duty than around work or even sports. As kids get older (and even during their teenage years), the male gaming experience is supplemented with copious amounts of porn.

What do you do about it if you’re one of these weaker men?

Obviously, if the above habits define your lifestyle you need to quit vices like porn. Video games (some of them) aren’t as bad morally, but they have similar addictive and unhealthy qualities.

But the best way to kick bad habits and obsessions is to gain new ones that make you stronger!

Which brings us to barbells.

The mantra to “be more active” is insidious because it’s true but it is too vague.

Also, the lifestyle that produced stronger men isn’t necessarily going to fix the problem in a young man who has been raised in a debilitating environment.

You need a specific program you can follow that will correct the problem. And that involves barbells.

Barbells can be incrementally modified to force your body (muscles and nervous system) to make and keep making gradual adaptations.

Barbells will provoke far better adaptations than weight machines or even dumbells.

The best place to go for a specific therapeutic program is Starting Strength, devised by Mark Rippetoe.

Here is a series of videos he did with The Art of Manliness’s Bret McAtee. These five lifts will change your life!

Tags

Joe Scudder

Joe Scudder is the "nom de plume" (or "nom de guerre") of a fifty-ish-year-old writer and stroke survivor. He lives in St Louis with his wife and still-at-home children. He has been a freelance writer and occasional political activist since the early nineties. He describes his politics as Tolkienesque.

Please leave your comments below

Facebook Comments

Disqus Comments