north korea

U.S. Refocuses on North Korean Humanitarian Crises Ahead of Conflict

Kim Jong Un’s continued and increasingly volatile threats toward the United States are plenty to warrant intervention in the reclusive nation, but darker, more sinister work is afoot.

North Korea is perhaps the world’s most isolated nation.  With a strict policy against outside media and an unhealthy focus on creating deities out of dictators, the hermit kingdom has long stood accused of some of the most heinous actions the world has ever seen.

Their penchant for angering neighbors and enemies alike has caused an enormous amount of strife for the citizens of North Korea, millions of whom perished due to famine in the mid 1990’s after global sanctions took an enormous toll on the economy.  All the while, DPRK leaders were living in the lap of luxury, growing fat on the spoils of their communist regime as ordinary North Koreans were quite literally harvesting grass from public parks to feed their families.

Now, as the U.S. continues to struggle with how best to handle Kim Jong Un’s incessant military provocation, a number of media outlets have turned to the ever-expanding story of North Korea’s concentration camps and the horrific ordeal of those imprisoned within.

“Fox News recently interviewed a survivor of one camp who described being ‘beaten black and blue and tortured constantly,’ beginning when he was just a teenager. He said each cell was stuffed with about twenty inmates, who were marched out to perform 14 hours of hard labor each day.

“’Cries and screams” were the daily soundtrack of life, to be replaced by ‘excruciating howls’ after midnight—not just from the victims of beatings, and the women dragged off to be raped by guards, but from prisoners who could feel their bodies disintegrating from the combination of malnutrition and labor.

“The State Department refers to the U.N. Commission of Inquiry on Human Rights report on North Korea, which the U.N. trenchantly notes was compiled with very little cooperation from Pyongyang. The report found ‘systematic, widespread, and gross human rights violations,’ frequently including outright crimes against humanity.

“An entire section of the U.N. report is devoted to ‘arbitrary detention, torture, executions, and prison camps.’ In addition to the horrors chronicled by the State Department, the U.N. report charges the Kim regime with using its brutal prison camps to ‘forcibly disappear’ Christian churches, which the regime sees as threats to its authority.”

Other stories from survivors of these camps would make even Heinrich Himmler weep in his grave.

The plight of these prisoners was brought to light in early 2017 as American inmate Otto Warmbier was returned to the United States by North Korea, having fallen into a coma merely days into his 15 year sentence for removing a poster from the wall of his hotel.  Warmbier died shortly after his homecoming, with doctors declaring that he had been in a vegetative state from the onset of his return.

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