2016-07-10 (1)

The Media Portrays Globalists as More Educated Than Nationalists. Here’s the Truth. [VIDEO]

In light of Brexit and Trump, articles are now explaining the conflict between educated globalists and nationalists. Translate “educated” as “brainwashed” for a more accurate understanding.

We’re starting to see media analysis of educated globalists and the forces of nationalism that are taking them by surprise. At The Atlantic, a writer claims that “Trust in Government Is Collapsing Around the World,” and that helps explain Trump and Brexit. While I think the collapse is long overdue, the article portrays it as a bad thing.

In democratic systems, this deep distrust of government is corrosive. For democracies to function properly, the German journalist Henrik Müller recently wrote, there must be “enough common values that [people] trust their institutions, that majorities and minorities respect one another, and that everyone generally deals fairly with one another.”

This only sounds persuasive if you disbelieve that your government is unduly influenced by a globalist oligarchy that seeks to brainwash the public and manipulate voters. And to disbelieve that, you have to be stupid and blind.

Or “educated.” Or “informed.”

The article quotes Richard Edelman, the head of the communications marketing firm Edelman:

“Between the top 25 percent of income earners and the bottom 25 percent of income earners, there’s a 31-point gap in trust in institutions in the United States,” he added. “Donald Trump comes right out of that statistic.”

The gap persists across countries facing varying degrees of economic difficulty: It’s 29 points in France, 26 points in Brazil, and 22 points in India.

The gap is 19 points in the United Kingdom, where those who recently voted to leave the European Union, generally had lower incomes and less education than those who voted to remain.

This article is useful to conservatives, but let us realize what is meant by “less education.” Less brainwashing. Less indoctrination.

In his great science fiction novel, That Hideous Strength, C. S. Lewis predicted much about the New World Order, including the role of the “informed” in believing government lies. One of his villains spells it out:

Why you fool, it’s the educated reader who can be gulled. All our difficulty comes with the others. When did you meet a workman who believes the papers? He takes it for granted that they’re all propaganda and skips the leading articles. He buys his paper for the football results and the little paragraphs about girls falling out of windows and corpses found in Mayfair flats. He is our problem. We have to recondition him. But the educated public, the people who read the highbrow weeklies, don’t need reconditioning. They’re all right already. They’ll believe anything.

And one of the ways they are manipulated is by being flattered as “educated.”

Here’s another example from the New York Times:

Globalization and a borderless world have been terrific for the educated, the young, the mobile, the multilingual, the multicultural. But globalization has been really tough for people whose jobs are tied to a community, whose mobility is limited by limited education, and — more positively — whose first allegiance is to their community, their locality, their place of birth.

Cosmopolitans are perpetually surprised that, A, they’re only 1 percent of the population, and, B, most people don’t think like them.

This article is even better than the one at The Atlantic, and the writer may realize the limitations of the word “educated.” But I suspect that most readers, who identify themselves as “educated,” will think this means they are superior thinkers, not that they are indoctrinated to support the globalist oligarchy.

Trust in government is a theme in Hillary Clinton’s campaign.

It seems to me that this is a promise of better and heavier propaganda. The uneducated nationalists must be turned into educated globalists.

In contrast, rather than talk about getting people to trust in government, Donald Trump claims he will make America great. Whether he is able to do such a thing, he is more concerned about accomplishing tasks than making people compliant.

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Joe Scudder

Joe Scudder is the "nom de plume" (or "nom de guerre") of a fifty-ish-year-old writer and stroke survivor. He lives in St Louis with his wife and still-at-home children. He has been a freelance writer and occasional political activist since the early nineties. He describes his politics as Tolkienesque.

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