North Korea

Did Trump’s Syria Strike Neuter North Korea?

 

Donald Trump is still working though what many would consider the infancy of his political career, but he has already been tasked with making serious military decisions.

The republican President’s campaign was built on extremely solid principals:  Law and order would be restored to the world around us, and the American people would always be safe.  While these purist goals seemed a bit lofty at the onset, after barely 100 days in office the newly anointed Commander in Chief has already put his money where his mouth is.

President Trump’s airstrike in Syria was a wake up call, not only to Syrian President and monster Bashar al-Assad, but also to the leadership in Russia.  The Kremlin’s involvement in Syria has been more than slightly significant, and America’s Thursday evening airstrike demonstrated an escalation in the assumed timeline for stability in the region.

Given the proximity between the 59-misssile bombardment of a desolate Syrian airfield and the inauguration of one Donald Trump, there is an argument to be made for the efficacy of the new administration.  This newfound urgency within the American government will certainly draw varied reactions from around the globe.

It’s a safe bet that one of those reactions will be North Korea’s audible gulp, followed by a swift reclusiveness.

“The U.S. bombardment of a Syrian airbase just outside of Homs Friday was likely seen by North Korea as a clear warning that President Trump will use his military if United States interests are at risk.

“The immediate focus after the strikes was on Russia’s Vladimir Putin’s reaction. Russia was not happy with the U.S., it spoke in defense of Syria and moved warships. But now the attention is on the next move by another world leader: Kim Jong-Un.”

“Gordon Chang, a Daily Beast columnist and author of ‘Nuclear Showdown: North Korea Takes On The World,’ said in an emailed statement to Fox News Friday that the U.S. strike on the Syrian airfield ‘tells North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un that he must now heed American military power, something that he probably dismissed before.’

“’Kim’s father, Kim Jong Il, disappeared from public view for about six weeks in 2003 at the time of the Iraq war. Kim Jong-Un loves the public spotlight, and it will be telling if he similarly goes into hiding,’ the author said.”

Kim Jong Un has been running amok in his despotic nation as of late, taunting not only the U.S., but the entire civilized world with his reckless military drills and angry rhetoric.  Some fear that the nation’s underground internet capabilities are injecting the reality of the global society into North Korea, tearing asunder the dictator’s flimsy control practices.

 

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