surviving-election-day

Surviving Election Day: How Minorities Encouraged Me

The key to surviving election day is to vote, avoid the news, and let enthusiastic people distract you from your fears.

I’m writing this because I am still working on surviving election day. By the time this post is published we might know the outcome, but I am writing much earlier.

I’ve done my part. I put my hands on the plunger and did not look back. Now I have to nothing to do but wait to find out if the detonators are set off by a majority of fellow voters.

I’m praying for an explosion against the establishment.

But that leaves me with a day of high anxiety.

What do I do?

Following the results on the Networks seems like self-inflicted torture. Why would I believe anything they say?

Even the networks acknowledge the problem. From the New York Times,

But as television news gears up for 2016’s big finale, an intense public distrust in the media is threatening the networks’ traditional role as election night scorekeeper.

There is a divided electorate, big segments of which are poised to question the veracity of Tuesday’s results. Donald J. Trump has refused to say if he will concede in the event of a projected defeat. And new digital competitors plan to break the usual election-night rules and issue real-time predictions long before polls close.

The era of Tim Russert’s famed whiteboard — when network anchors could serve as the ultimate authority on election results — has faded. And scrutiny on big media organizations on Tuesday, when 70 million people might tune in, is likely to be harsher than ever.

“We’re surrounded by so much false information and aggressive misinformation,” said James Goldston, the president of ABC News, who will oversee coverage from a Times Square studio built for the occasion. “The pain of getting it wrong in this environment would be very long-lasting.”

In my opinion, this is too little too late. The pain we have suffered watching them campaign for Hillary has already done its damage. I’m not going to watch network news.

Instead I found two Twitter hashtags to follow that were amazing: #blacksfortrump and #latinosfortrump.

Consider this video by a Latina voter:

Or consider this:

Or this video of a news clip and a black voter standing behind the reporter.

Or this tweet from Pennsylvania:

You know the outcome by the time you’re reading this, but I don’t. I don’t know if these people’s hopes will come true of not. But it was encouraging to me nonetheless. I loved them for being hopeful. It reminded me that there are Americans of every race all over this country that I am proud to have as my fellow citizens.

They made surviving election day easy.

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Joe Scudder

Joe Scudder is the "nom de plume" (or "nom de guerre") of a fifty-ish-year-old writer and stroke survivor. He lives in St Louis with his wife and still-at-home children. He has been a freelance writer and occasional political activist since the early nineties. He describes his politics as Tolkienesque.

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