secession

Secession Becomes All The Rage in At Least A Half Dozen States

President Donald Trump has had a polarizing effect on much of the United States in the infancy of his first term, but some locales are taking their vitriol too far.

Whether they are being spurred on by the success of Great Britain’s grand “Brexit” vote, or of lawmakers are simply attempting to maintain a capitulatory relationship with their constituents for their own political gain, several states within the nation are now openly considering seceding from the U.S. in the wake of the conservative republican’s election.

California, of course, was one of the first to float the idea.  The liberal haven has for years opposed any conservative viewpoint, from the mundane to the magnanimous.  It comes as no surprise that the Bear Republic would be an early provider of such comic relief.  Now, however, it seems that a few others are following suit.

“Nationwide, interest in seceding is fairly strong. An online survey by Reuters in 2014 found that nearly one in four Americans want their state to secede. The desire was highest — 34 percent — in the Southwest, which includes Texas.

“In some areas of the country there is no organized effort to split from the U.S., just a feeling that ‘we’ve been left behind and no one cares about us,’ said Dwayne Yancey, editorial page editor of The Roanoke Times who in March wrote what he called a ‘tongue in cheek’ editorial, ‘Should Southwest Virginia secede from the rest of Virginia?’

“’Historically we have felt left out, and a number of those issues are coming to a head,’ Yancey said. Southwest Virginia is mostly rural, white and poor. Coal mining has declined dramatically, although the city of Roanoke has had a stable economy with Virginia Tech University and other employers, he said. Yet, the feeling is that the state Legislature in Richmond is ‘not doing right by us here.’

“Despite the heightened interest in secession, many lawyers and constitutional scholars say it’s legally impossible for a state to secede because the U.S. Constitution doesn’t address the issue, and has no provision to allow it.

“The U.S. Supreme Court declared in an 1869 case, Texas vs. White, that the United States is ‘an indestructible union.’ And the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia wrote in a 2006 letter that ‘if there was any constitutional issue resolved by the Civil War, it is that there is no right to secede.’

“Yet some lawyers, historians and secession groups argue that the 10th Amendment of the Constitution gives states the right to decide many issues which are not in the power of the federal government. And despite the legal obstacles, the desire for self-rule and separation from others with different political, social or moral views remains strong among some groups.”

Among the less obvious secession candidates, New York State has recently considered a split of its own.  With New York City’s massive liberal population swaying the politics of the rest of the extremely conservative state, leaders outside of The Big Apple have called for outright secession in the past, as well as the possibility of splitting New York City off into its own district, much like Washington D.C., with the remainder of the state becoming “New Amsterdam”.

At this juncture, with the political climate such as it is in America, any attempt to secede will surely be met with raucous action and force, something that the anti-Trump instigators surely do not wish to engage in.

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