Minimum wage

Restaurant Servers Grateful For Rollback of Maine’s Minimum Wage Hike

Across the country, a debate is raging over the minimum wage that we pay American workers, with many on the left pushing to double the going rate for entry-level work.

Economic experts are largely siding with fiscally conservative lawmakers, however, in claiming that a massive uptick in the national minimum wage would create enormous problems for job-creating businesses.  Enormous corporations such as McDonald’s have already been affected by exorbitant minimum wages in leftist colony California, and their solution was to eliminate a vast majority of jobs in their restaurants by installing self-serve kiosks.  Other fast food giants have been forced to look into similar equipment as well, creating an uncertain situation for the future of America’s job market.

Now, in Maine, servers and waitresses have been successful in reversing such faulty and foolish legislation, returning their minimum wage to the preferable, lower amount.

“The minimum wage for tipped workers in Maine is half that of the state’s regular minimum wage ($9). It’s called the ‘tip credit’ rule, as it allows employers to take a credit of up to 50 percent from their employees’ wages, because servers will generally make that money back (and hopefully more) in tips. If tips and wages, together, don’t equal the state’s minimum wage, employers are required to make up the difference.

“But, at November’s referendum, the Maine House voted to raise the minimum wage by $1 each year (through 2024) and to remove the tip credit rule entirely, meaning that all employees — tipped or not — would be earning the state’s minimum wage, reports the Portland Press Herald.

“That’s when something unexpected happened.

“State Senator James Dill, a Democrat who initially voted to raise wages, told the Washington Post that after the Nov. referendum passed, he received “hundreds” of calls and emails from servers who were worried about their livelihood.

“As a result, Dill threw his support behind a Republican measure to return the ‘tip credit’ rule. After passing through the Senate on June 7, the bill was brought before the House on June 13, where it passed with a vote of 110-37.

“Maine Governor Paul LePage signed the bill into law last week. It will go into effect 90 days after Legislature adjourned, reports the Bangor Daily News. “

Maine’s experience is certainly indicative of a majority of service industry jobs throughout the nation.

Without such workers, the nation would simply cease to function.  These are the unsung heroes of our daily lives, and the establishments in which they perfect their craft are reliant upon the leniency of wages to continue to offer their services and goods at current prices.  Should the national minimum wage be exorbitantly raised to $15, God forbid, the cost of those goods and services will simply skyrocket, causing an artificial inflation that could greatly affect our nation’s economy.

 

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