Remembering 9/11: 1683

Remembering 9/11: 1683

One of the most important dates for Western Europe is the anniversary of the Battle of Vienna, which the largely Polish forces won on September 11, 1683. Outnumbered and against all odds, the Polish held off Islamic invaders at the Gates of Vienna for the last time– until now. Islamists called Vienna the “Golden Apple,” because once captured, they would be able to invade and conquer all of Europe.

Islamists had already invaded and conquered Serbia, Croatia, Romania, Bulgaria and Hungary, while also repeatedly attacking Rome, Jerusalem, and Vienna for centuries. After conquering Vienna, the goal was to travel further to Rome, to transform the Basilica of Saint Peter into a Mosque once and for all. (Pope Leopold began the practice of paying off Islamic invaders to stop them from repeatedly sieging Rome.)

Contrary to the fictional tales presidential candidate Carly Fiorina told two weeks after America’s 9/11 in 2001 (Islamic civilization between 800-1600 AD was one of the best in the world), and Barack Obama (America was founded on Islamic principles of freedom), Europeans lived under perpetual fear of Islamic invaders since the mid-7th Century.

For centuries Mongol-Tartar raiding parties destroyed crops, fields, and acres of European countryside, abducted women and children for slaves, while the Ottoman Turks did the same, and were synonymous with “pillage, sacrilege and extortion.” After the Mongol Khans succumbed to Islam, they began to invade like the Turks, adding forced conversion to Islam, or death, in addition to pillage.

Again, contrary to the fictional tales told by Fiorina and Obama, battles waged in Europe, including every one of the 8 Crusades, was fought because Europeans sought to defend themselves on their land from Islamic invaders. No Muslim ever lived in Jerusalem, France, Spain, Holland, or anywhere else for that matter, before the mid-7th Century. Islam did not become a political and military enterprise until 622, the Year of Hijrah, when Muhammad led 40,000 troops to conquer Mecca.

On September 11, 1683, at the Battle of Vienna, Polish King Jan Sobieski was able to ward off the Islamic invasion of Europe as Charles Martel had done against Abdul Rahman Al Ghafiqi at the Battle of Tours in France in 732. (Non-coincidentally, the Islamic invaders waved black flags then, as they do now.)

Sobieski did so miraculously; leading roughly 30,000 Polish-Lithuanian troops, and roughly 10,000 Austrian-Prussian troops against the Ottoman leader Kara Mustapha Pasha’s 300,000 troops. Because of brilliant maneuvering by Sobieski and the fortitude of the Polish people, Poland earned on 9/11 1683, its title, “Prougnaculum Christianitatis,” the bulwark of Christianity.

Also, non-coincidentally, the Ottomans had signed a treaty with Austria, which King Leopold believed Sultan Mehmed II would honor. Mehmed did not honor it. Leopold chose not to prepare when warned and fled Austria on the eve of his country’s invasion, leaving his people’s fate in the hands of a Polish king. Fortunately for Austria, and Europe, one year prior, Polish, Prussian and Austrian leaders had formed an alliance of mutual defense in case the Ottomans violated their treaty. Were it not for Jan Sobieski, no military defense could have withstood a battle that seemed lost before it ever began.

The below film is worth watching, especially in light of the ongoing Islamic invasion of Europe in which Western leaders, just like King Leopold, wrongly believe the false promises made by Islamists. Unlike the Europeans of 1683, Europeans today have an even greater insurmountable disadvantage– because they have no Jan Sobieski.

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Bethany Blankley

Bethany Blankley is a political analyst for Fox News Radio and has appeared on television and radio programs nationwide. She writes about political, cultural, and religious issues in America from the perspective of an evangelical and former communications staffer. She was a communications strategist for four U.S. Senators, one U.S. Congressman, a former New York governor, and several non-profits. She earned her MA in Theology from The University of Edinburgh, Scotland and her BA in Political Science from the University of Maryland. Follow her @bethanyblankley facebook.com/BlankleyBethany/ & BethanyBlankley.com.

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