opioids

Ohio Takes Drastic Action on Opioid Overdoses After Massive 2016 Spike

While our nation faces a number of external threats, not the least of which rhymes with “dim kong bun”, there is one issue that is tearing away at our heartland.

The over-use of opioid painkillers is one of the most egregious threats that the people of America face today.  The Big Pharmaceutical industry has been pushing these dangerous and addictive drugs on the population for decades, with rebates and kickbacks for doctors willing to prescribe their patients drugs such as Oxycontin and Vicodin.  These drugs carry with them a ridiculous likeness to narcotics such as heroin, leading many Americans down a path of addiction that ends either in failure, rehabilitation, illness, and often death.

Opioid dependency is an extremely difficult problem to treat.  Not only are the drugs unbelievably addicting, but the pressure that doctors and hospitals are under to prescribe their use is borderline criminal.

Now, the state of Ohio is taking a long, hard look at what the government can do to curb the abuse of such drugs.

“Officials are putting strict new limits on how many painkillers doctors in Ohio are allowed to prescribe after a report released Wednesday shows overdose deaths spiked again in 2016.

“Data released by the Ohio Department of Health Wednesday shows opioid overdose deaths increased last year over the record breaking numbers seen in 2015. Roughly 11 people die each day in the state from accidental overdoses, with the majority of deaths connected to heroin and fentanyl combinations, reports FOX 45 Now.

“Deaths from drug overdoses increased by exactly 1,000 over 2015, totaling 4,050. In response, Republican Gov. John Kasich announced he is placing new restrictions on opioids, limiting prescriptions to a seven-day supply for adults and a five-day supply for minors.

“’When you’re dispensing this stuff, in some aspects its like walking around with a loaded gun,’ Kasich said at a press conference Wednesday, according to FOX 45 Now. ‘You have a responsibility to do this the right way.’”

Another aspect to consider when working to eradicate needless overdoses is the coming of age of marijuana, and the widespread decriminalization of the plant.

In areas where pot is legal, either medicinally or recreationally, opioid abuse becomes a far smaller concern.  Those seeking the escape of recreational drugs are far more likely to turn to the relative safety of cannabis for their kicks or their pain management, over the hassle and difficulty of procuring these highly sought after opiate-based narcotics.

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