Obama Spied, our Constitution Died

Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution: The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

In two different investigative reports by Circa.com, we’ve learned that not only did Obama’s NSA ignore the Fourth Amendment and collect information on Americans, but the FBI was sharing that information with outside parties. If you get your news from the mainstream media, you probably haven’t been exposed to either of these reports, because they are still protecting Barack Obama

When a nation is at war as America is now,  the government needs to find a balance between the need to protect her citizens. However even during a war that enters American territory such as the War on Terror, the federal government is not allowed to throw constitutional protections out the window. That’s one of the reasons for developing the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISA). To grant search warrants for intelligence agencies to spy on foreign communications that involve American citizens.

Three days ago we learned that Obama’s NSA ignored the FISA court and its own regulations that were publicly promised to the American people, and violated those Fourth Amendment privacy protections while searching foreign intercepts that involved Americans without FISA court warrants. And OH BOY did they anger the FISA court. Circa.com used once-secret documents to reveal the Obama administration’s most serious constitutional abuses to date by the U.S. intelligence community.

More than 5 percent, or one out of every 20 searches seeking upstream Internet data on Americans inside the NSA’s so-called Section 702 database violated the safeguards Obama and his intelligence chiefs vowed to follow in 2011, according to one classified internal report reviewed by Circa.

The Obama administration self-disclosed the problems at a closed-door hearing Oct. 26 before the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court that set off alarm. Trump was elected less than two weeks later.

The normally supportive court censured administration officials, saying the failure to disclose the extent of the violations earlier amounted to an “institutional lack of candor” and that the improper searches constituted a “very serious Fourth Amendment issue,” according to a recently unsealed court document dated April 26, 2017 (embedded below).

This raises a question about all of those excuses by Susan Rice about “incidental collection” of American’s data When communications of American citizens are incidentally picked up during the surveillance of others, their identities are to remain secret so their names are usually redacted or identified by a generic term such as “American One.”

 

Read the Rest of the Story at the Lid

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