mlk-jr-i-have-a-dream Martin Luther King Jr

Would Martin Luther King Junior Be Disappointed in His Brothers and Sisters Today?

In my younger days I was an active participant in the civil rights movement in Columbus, Ohio. I was part of the organization that filed the federal lawsuit to desegregate the Columbus Public Schools. I watched, with great interest last weekend, Mr. Trump’s meeting at The Great Faith Ministries Black Church in Detroit and the reception to his message that he received from the leadership and congregation.

I applaud Mr. Trump’s attempt to reach out to the black community to try and give it potentially another voice and a new advocate. I wrote a commentary recently on the War on Poverty, and while the Democrats had good intentions in 1964, over the last 52 years their outcome was disastrous for the black community. Our government spent $22 trillion of taxpayer money on the War on Poverty that is more than was spent on all the wars in the history of this country, including the current conflicts.

Depending on how you count, there have been seven generations of people who lived under the War on Poverty. There is evidence that the war took the black father out of the home and replaced him with the government. Look at the recent Democratic Convention, they had the mothers of people who were shot, but where were the fathers? Joyce Kelly of Reuters wrote. “Father’s absence “decimates” black community in U.S.” The statistics also show that this burden falls more heavily on black children. Some 56 percent of black children lived in single-parent families in 2004, with most of those families headed by mothers. That figure compared with 22 percent of white children and 31 percent of Hispanic children.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. gave a famous speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, in Washington, D.C. called “I have a Dream” Speech. Let’s look at some of the highlights of the speech and see what has happened. I wonder what Dr. King would think of the actions of his brothers and sisters and America over the last 53 years.

On August 8, 1963 He said, “It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Black Community a bad check; a check which has come back marked “insufficient funds.” As was mentioned above $22 trillion was spent on the War on Poverty that was American taxpayer money, but where did it go? Would Dr. King want some accountability? Did America send the checks to Black America as he wanted? What did the Black Community get for the $22 Trillion?

Black Lives Matter/ Martin thought all lives matter

He said, “The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to a distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny. And they have come to realize that their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom. We cannot walk alone.”

Dr. King realized the importance of working together, all the races, so that all races would benefit from the solidarity including Blacks. Dividing us as a nation will only benefit a few.

Using their vote

He said, “We cannot be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi cannot vote and a Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote. No, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream.”

For over 50 years the majority of black people have been voting for the Democratic Party and for all the voting what progress have they made? The Democratic Party has presumed that over 90% of blacks will vote for Democrats because Republicans haven’t gone into the black community to ask for votes.

He said, “Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to South Carolina, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed. Let us not wallow in the valley of despair.”

The murder rate and the abortion rate in the intercity is genocide on black people. After 7 generations it is hard to break the chains of slavery to the Democratic Party that wants to keep blacks off the payrolls and on the welfare programs. Blacks themselves will have to break those chains and I think Republicans can help break the cycle.

His Dream may no longer be the dream of many in the Black Community

He said, “And when this happens, and when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children, black men and white men, Jews and gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual, “Free at last! Free at last! Thank God Almighty, we are free at last!”

The American economy is no longer free; we have 10 million more people employed in government jobs than people working in manufacturing jobs. Without opportunity we have no future. We will become a nation who will slowly loose its will to succeed. America needs a change, it needs to be free, and if we become truly free then Dr. King’s words will ring true, “Free at last! Free at last! Thank God Almighty, we are free at last!”

Tags

Dan Perkins

Dan Perkins is a current events commentator who writes for several blogs including Constitution.com, thehill.com, the dailycaller.com, and thedailysurge.com among others. He is the author of the trilogy on radical Islamic terrorism against the United States called the Brotherhood of the Red Nile. Dan can be heard on W4CY radio.com on Tuesdays at 8 PM Eastern.

Please leave your comments below

Facebook Comments

Disqus Comments