ISIS False Flag Attack at the Fort Lauderdale Airport?

If it wasn’t an ISIS false flag attack then the attacker was having delusions of being a “Manchurian” shooter.

Questions about a terrorist shooting being an ISIS false flag attack have surfaced before. They are usually farfetched. The only reason to worry about them is that the media typically refuses to investigate the discrepancies that give rise to the suspicion of a false flag.

False flag attacks have happened in American history. The possibility should not automatically be discounted. One such false flag strategy was carried out by the CIA and NATO. Known as Operation Gladio, terrorist attacks were perpetrated in Italy and blamed on Communists in order to sway public opinion.

Consider this editorial from a Florida newspaper, which is aimed at demanding answers from the FBI on why they didn’t put the shooter on the no-fly list. First, it reminds us of how the FBI seems to have mistakenly cleared the Orlando shooter:

At least in the case of Omar Mateen, the disturbed young man who pledged allegiance to ISIS as he massacred 49 and wounded 53 at Orlando’s Pulse nightclub last June, the FBI had raised its antenna and tracked his routine for 10 months before mistakenly closing the case.

I think the FBI’s non-helpful involvement deserves more answers regarding the nightclub shooter, including answers to questions about a second shooter. I’m not the only one who thinks a false flag attack is a possible explanation for what happened at the Pulse nightclub.

The editorial continues (emphasis added):

But from what little the FBI is saying in Fort Lauderdale, it appears the agency demonstrated insufficient attention after Santiago walked into its Anchorage office in November in a “very agitated state.”

According to various reports, Santiago said he wanted to talk about the government having taken over his mind, about being forced to watch propaganda videos on ISIS and about feeling forced to fight for the Islamic State terror group.

You’d think words like ISIS and Islamic State would hit agents in the face. They should have been especially concerned — if they knew — that the Iraqi combat veteran had reportedly been discharged from the Alaska Guard in August “for unsatisfactory performance.”

But it appears the FBI handed off the problem and failed to follow up.

The main problem with the Fort Lauderdale airport shooting being an ISIS false flag attack is that it involves the idea that a human being could be put under “mind control.” It has never been proven to my satisfaction that the CIA and/or other government agencies succeeded in this endeavor. There is good reason to believe they tried, but not that they succeeded.

But it is hard to know for sure.

The book I read on the subject, Brainwash: The Secret History of Mind Control by Dominic Streatfeild, argued that the experiments didn’t produce workable results. But Streatfeild includes a chapter on the ritual Satanic sexual abuse craze of the nineties. He argues convincingly that most of the accusations were untrue. But, in so doing, he argues that at least one person who was accused, actually was brainwashed into believing he did it!

So, if a person can be mind-controlled into confessing to a crime he didn’t commit, what’s so implausible about a person being mind-controlled into an ISIS false flag attack?

I don’t know the answer to the question. Maybe I’m too influenced by the re-make of the mind control (and hopefully science-fiction) thriller, The Manchurian Candidate. But I wish the media would investigate this sort of possibility.

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