Shall Not

Is The Bill of Rights Expendable?

Nearly all Americans and their leaders ignored what should have been widely celebrated on December 15, 2015: the 224th anniversary of the Bill of Rights. The first ten amendments to the Constitution, known as The Bill of Rights, were ratified on December 15, 1791.

(Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) appears to be the only U.S. Senator who mentioned this significant date (during the fifth Republican national debate).)

When our Founding Fathers established the U.S. Constitution they realized the need to clarify certain rights not specified in the Constitution– to identify what Congress and the federal government cannot do.

They clarified exactly how the government “shall not infringe” upon individual liberties. Known as the “Shall Nots of Congress,” the Bill of Rights specify what Congress cannot do: “Congress shall make no law… .”

As reported on Constitution.com:

“Even more telling– the first ten amendments, with perhaps The Sixth as the exception, all define what the government cannot do:

  • First: “Shall make no law … prohibiting … abridging,
  • Second: “Shall not be infringed”
  • Third: “No soldier shall … without the consent …”
  • Fourth: “Shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue …”
  • Fifth: “No person shall be held … nor shall any person be subject …”
  • Seventh: “Shall be preserved … No fact … shall be otherwise reexamined …”
  • Eighth: “Shall not be required … Nor excessive … imposed, nor … punishments inflicted”
  • Ninth: “shall not be construed to deny or disparage
  • Tenth: “Not delegated … nor prohibited.”

“The third, fifth, eighth, and tenth amendments don’t state ‘rights;'”

 

“They state what authority the government does not have. In effect, limits on government are universal human rights.

 

“The Constitution outlines specific areas of human life that are off-limits to government. This suggests that there are certain aspects of human life which are fundamentally free.”

For two centuries, these ten amendments, The Bill of Rights were considered unbreakable and rigorously defended by political leaders and the courts.”

But Obama’s “Hope and Change” and significantly changed America, for the worse. Obama has no problem:

  • Blatantly violating the First Amendment, by violating Christians’ right to the freedom of religion and the exercise of their religion.
  • Violating the Second Amendment right to own and bear firearms, especially considering his recent illegal national registry of gun owners.
  • Violating the Fourth Amendment right of Americans to be secure in their homes, papers, and personal effects against unreasonable searches and seizures. Just consider the latest attempt to end privacy on the Internet.
  • Violating the Tenth Amendment and State’s rights, especially numerous executive orders and demands related to requiring illegal immigrants and refugees “aid and comfort.”

Obama’s open violation of the Bill of Rights goes hand in hand with his frequent violations of the U.S. Constitution and multiple federal laws. Yet no one appears to be willing to legally stop him from his lawlessness.

When the political leaders and candidates are willing to violate the Bill of Rights to support their own personal agenda, it seems the Bill of Rights is expendable. The precedent has now been set to allow violations of the Bill of Rights and U.S. Constitution to go unnoticed without fear of prosecution for crimes as great as treason. Our leaders are supposed to represent an exemplary role model for Americans and the world. Instead, their example will sadly lead to anarchy and the total collapse America– unless they are stopped.

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Dave Jolly

R.L. David Jolly holds a B.S. in Wildlife Biology and an M.S. in Biology – Population Genetics. He has worked in a number of fields, giving him a broad perspective on life, business, economics and politics. He is a very conservative Christian, husband, father and grandfather who cares deeply for his Savior, family and the future of our troubled nation.

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