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The Harmony Times: How America Moves Forward

Tranquility, Georgia.

At 7:18 on Monday morning, Mrs. Edith Thurgood, the solitary registered Democrat in the Sarah Oglethorpe Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, posted a Facebook status expressing her support for a recount in the Presidential Election.

“I don’t see what the big deal is,” wrote Thurgood in the post. “If results were fair and square, Republicans have nothing to fear.”

D.A.R. President Geraldine Fernway was drinking her second cup of decaf when Thurgood’s status hit. Over the past week, President Fernway had posted two Facebook status updates celebrating the Divine intervention that had carried Donald Trump into the Oval Office. As far as she was concerned, doubting Trump’s Presidency was not only unpatriotic but also blasphemous.

Thurgood’s patriotism had been questioned in hushed tones during the 2012 election, but since Thurgood could prove direct descent from Richard Henry Lee, her past offenses had been overlooked. This bold, open defiance, however– this assault on America itself–had to be addressed.

Fernway contacted Kiki Whitson, a fellow alto in the First Tranquility Methodist Church Choir. “You’ve got to talk to Edith,” said Fernway.

“I saw it,” said Whitson. “But I don’t know how anybody could talk sense to her. Bertie Thomas and I ‘been on the phone about it for the past thirty minutes. I put a call in to the minister to see if he would do something, but he’s out this morning.”

The women hung up the phone and walked circles in their own kitchens. Whitson suddenly broke pace, marched over to her desktop, and linked two posts: “Hillary Clinton and The New World Order: THE EVIDENCE,” and, “Traitors in Your Home Town.”

Fernway looked up everything she could on Richerd Henry Lee, Googling “illegitimate sons,” and “DNA tests.”

Meanwhile, Edith Thurgood had shut her laptop to step out into her back yard to work up a tired flower bed with a couple of flats of purple and yellow pansies. Her next door neighbor, Henry Riddle, leaned over the fence and said, “I sure do like that dark black mulch.”

“Got it at the Greenery,” said Thurgood.

“Edith, I saw your Facebook post about the recount. I’d like to know why you feel that way. And I have a few thoughts I’d like for you to consider on the matter.”

“Well, Henry. I appreciate you asking,” said Thurgood. “Why don’t you come on over after I get these pansies in, and I’ll cut you a piece of coconut cake, and we can talk about it.”

“Not sure we’ll agree in the end, but I never turned down a piece of coconut cake in my life,” said Riddle.

At 11:00 A.M., Thurgood and Riddle sat down over two cups of English Breakfast tea and had a civil discussion about the role of government in America.  They asked each other eight fair questions, made reference to five historical court cases, and provided ten personal examples that had helped them develop their present belief system.

Both left the conversation understanding one another better, and Thurgood sent Riddle home with half a coconut cake wrapped up in Saran Wrap. Later that day, Riddle helped Thurgood lift the top back onto her concrete bird feeder.

Felicity Graves

Felicity Graves – is a travel writer with a life dream of installing a pot-bellied stove in a renovated school bus. Her favorite color is green, and she’s never fully recovered from her childhood crush on Jimmy Stewart. Once she had “The Lion Sleeps Tonight” stuck in her head for six days straight, an experience which sometimes causes her flashbacks at the most inopportune moments. In January of 2016, she completed one of her long term goals, dissolving an entire Brach’s cinnamon hard candy in her mouth without wincing or shedding a tear. Her column, The Harmony Times, seeks to cast vision for micro humanity in a world gone mad.

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