porous border

Frenchman Exposes Porous Border into His Country [VIDEO]

He returned to France from Syria and got through the porous border in less than a minute.

After terrorist attacks, you would think that France would do something about their porous border. But you would be wrong.

According to RT.com,

France is the primary country of origin of people who left to fight for Islamic State (IS, formerly ISIS/ISIL) in the Middle East, as more than 900 of its citizens traveled to Syria and Iraq to join the extremists, according to research conducted by the International Centre for Counter-Terrorism (ICCT) this spring.

According to the research, almost 4,300 foreign fighters from the EU joined Islamic State in Syria and Iraq and about 30 percent of them already returned to their home countries.

Most of those returning to France could use the PARAFE e-passport automatic border control machines that allow quick border check processing at the French airports. To use the PARAFE system, registration on a national database is required beforehand. Citizens of the European Union, the European Economic Union, and the Swiss Confederation are eligible. Registration is valid for five years across all airports equipped with the PARAFE facility.

First installed in 2009, the PARAFE (Automated Fast Track Crossing at External Borders) system enables airports to reduce waiting times for border checks, using biometric authentication technology contained in the e-passport.

2 Problems: Political Correctness & No Sovereignty

Obviously, political correctness, masquerading as compassion and respect for human dignity, is involved here. But the other issue is the compromise in national sovereignty. French voters should have the power to make French politicians beef up security. But they have much less influence over the EU. Angela Merkel has far more influence over French policy than do French voters.

So France gets porous borders because the politicians are more concerned with conforming to the political correctness of other politicians than meeting the needs of their countrymen.

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Joe Scudder

Joe Scudder is the "nom de plume" (or "nom de guerre") of a fifty-ish-year-old writer and stroke survivor. He lives in St Louis with his wife and still-at-home children. He has been a freelance writer and occasional political activist since the early nineties. He describes his politics as Tolkienesque.

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