Health Insurance Options

These Five States Will Have No Health Insurance Options in 2017

They will have no health insurance options because only one company offers plans on the exchanges.

These states will have no health insurance options because all the other insurance companies got tired of losing money.

In Alabama, Alaska, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and Wyoming, residents will not be given any options at healthcare.gov. There will only be a single company offering plans. Their only choice will be to accept that policy or not get health insurance until the penalty becomes too harsh.

And the problem goes far beyond those five state. Last year, only two percent of enrollees were stuck with only one health insurance provider for their counties. In 2017, almost a fifth of American enrollees will be in that situation.

Remember, the Democrats (and many Republican traitors) think it is unthinkable to simply repeal the Affordable Care Act no matter how unaffordable it is and how little care is given.

Thus, the only options that these people will acknowledge as “reasonable,” are increasing the severity of the penalties for not enrolling in Obamacare, increasing subsidies, and introducing a pure government option.

All these things will simply make prices go up. Rationing will eventually be added to the mix to address the prices that the government’s tampering has caused to go up.

What is absolutely unthinkable is letting free people take care of themselves and meet needs in an unhampered marketplace. The answer to government disaster is never to remove government but always add more government.

According to columnist A. Barton Hinkle, at Reason.com:

The obvious lesson here is that the government shouldn’t try to hammer square pegs into round holes. So naturally, Washington is ignoring it. President Obama thinks the answer is to create a “public option”—a government insurance program—for the exchanges, to spur competition.

Brilliant plan: Insurance companies already have a hard time eking out a profit on the exchanges, so set up a nonprofit competitor to underbid them. That’ll have them knocking down the door to get back in, right?

To others, the answer lies in jacking up the federal tax penalties levied on those who don’t buy insurance to make nonparticipation altogether too painful. In their view, government is just not being punitive enough.

It’s not surprising that politicians think this way. It is surprising that voters go along with it.

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Joe Scudder

Joe Scudder is the "nom de plume" (or "nom de guerre") of a fifty-ish-year-old writer and stroke survivor. He lives in St Louis with his wife and still-at-home children. He has been a freelance writer and occasional political activist since the early nineties. He describes his politics as Tolkienesque.

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