Charlottesville: It’s NOT All Black and White

Usually, an opinion and perspective regarding a particular issue crystallize in my conciseness very quickly.

However when it came to President Trump’s reaction to the march and violence in Charlottesville last weekend, coming to an opinion literally made me sick to my stomach.

Trump’s comment’s regarding Charlottesville weren’t all wrong as his critics have implied nor were they all good as his supporters have said.  Much of what the President said wrong was very horrible, some of it was good. He never said some of the quotes he is being criticized and much of the reaction of the press and his liberal critics is both mendacious and very ugly.

The president addressed Charlottesville three times. But it was really the third time, during a press conference where he outlined an impressive red-tape cutting proposal when the wheels fell off the presidential wagon.

His first statement made last Saturday was pretty good,

“We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry, and violence, on many sides. On many sides. It’s been going on for a long time in our country. Not Donald Trump, not Barack Obama. This has been going on for a long, long time.”

The president was criticized for not specifically mentioning the white supremacists or the neo-Nazis. So Monday he made an even better statement mentioning those two hate groups. The press spent much of the next 24 hours trashing that statement also. That was a trap. So when the media started barking questions about Charlottesville during an economic-oriented press opportunity on Tuesday, an angry President Trump walked right into their trap. He went off the rails with this comment:

“But you had many people in that group other than neo-Nazis and white nationalists.  Okay?  And the press has treated them absolutely unfairly. Now, in the other group also, you had some fine people.  But you also had troublemakers, and you see them come with the black outfits and with the helmets, and with the baseball bats.  You had a lot of bad people in the other group.”

To put it more succinctly President Trump said there was good and bad on both sides

As a Jew who has relatives with numbers tattooed on their arms, and an activist who reminds people never to forget what happened during the Holocaust and that there’s nothing comparable in scale to the Shoah, there is no more disgusting people alive today than those who call themselves Nazi and/or marches around with a Nazi flag.  While there may be good people who believe the Robert E. Lee statue should stay up they weren’t there last Saturday.

NO ONEnot one person who decided to march alongside people who were carrying the swastika and Hitler’s Nazi flag could EVER be considered “good.”

America expects more from its president, and sadly just like his predecessor when President Trump should have risen up to be a leader—he failed.

As a political pundit, Trump’s comment was just plain stupid. He had just finished making a great six-minute speech about how he would speed up the approval process for infrastructure. That was supposed to be followed by the president turning the floor over to members of his economic team for questions.  But instead using that moment to advance his of agenda, Trump’s words set it back. By now Trump must realize that even if he said everything perfect the media and liberals would trash him. But he didn’t say everything perfectly, he screwed up and allowed his anger to get the best of him.

Some of the criticism directed towards the President for his Tuesday news conference is either wrong or invents quotes he didn’t make…

 

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