atheists

This Atheist Hate Group Is Attacking Our Christian Heritage Again

Let’s just say this upfront: The atheist Freedom From Religion Foundation is a hate group, plain and simple. It’s right up there with the KKK, except instead of targeting people because of skin color, it targets people and groups because of religious beliefs.

And just like the KKK at various points in the past enjoyed the support and protection of local, state and even the federal government, so the FFRF enjoys official protection today by our court system’s far left-leaning judges and liberal politicians.

Relying on that support, and liberals’ twisting of the idea of a “wall of separation between church and state” (a phrase that is NOT in the Constitution), the FFRF has used legal threats and propaganda to bit by bit destroy any public signs of Christian history in this country.

A current target is a large stone cross that has existed for decades in a park in Santa Clara, California.

The name of the park is Memorial Cross Park. It exists as a memorial to a Spanish mission that operated on the spot in the 18th century. The missions were, as any history student knows, key players in shaping what would eventually be California. The historic marker was a donation to the city of Santa Clara by the local Lions Club back in 1953. The city has maintained the park, with its cross, as a public asset since that time, so this is not by any means a new thing, and it is not an attempt to establish an official religion by the city.

None of that matters to the FFRF, which only sees a despised symbol of their hated Christian enemies and therefore is suing the city.

The FFRF had harassed the city back in 2012 about the cross, but is now suing in the name of Santa Clara resident and atheist Andrew Defaria. That’s the way the FFRF operates. Whenever its staff becomes aware of a publicly visible cross, monument, image of the Ten Commandments, biblical slogan or what have you, it sends out a threatening letter, and if it can’t immediately intimidate authorities into erasing Judeo-Christian history, the FFRF begins looking for some local tool from its mailing list to be the proxy complainant in a lawsuit.

The FFRF claims it is “protecting the constitutional principle of separation of church and state,” but that is not a principle expressed in the Constitution. Just like the KKK hides its real intentions behind claims of protecting “white culture,” the FFRF hides its goals behind “separation of church and state,” a phrase that comes from a letter written by Thomas Jefferson to a concerned pastor. What Jefferson meant by the phrase was that the First Amendment would protect churches and individuals from government interference in the practice and expression of religious beliefs.

That, of course, is precisely what the FFRF is doing, using the government, with the complicity of liberal judges, to systematically interfere in Christianity by uprooting it from public life and to rewrite history to promote the religion of atheism.

If you look at the FFRF’s own words on its website, it pushes a revisionist, propagandized view of history in which virtually all “social and moral progress” is brought about by atheists, laying claim to everything from ending slavery to giving women the right to vote.

Behind its high-sounding words, the FFRF is little more than a band of terrorists that uses legal trickery rather than suicide bombings to force society to change to its way of thinking. Its strategy is simple: Clear out as much evidence of biblical religion from public sight as possible, then fill the vacuum with atheist teachings.

The FFRF is working hard — and successfully — to establish a state religion, right under the noses of the American people.

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Tad Cronn

Tad Cronn began his journalism career in 1983. While he earned awards for his work as a reporter and editor, his greatest joy is writing news commentary. Providing a conservative and often humorous outlook on current events, he now works as a freelance writer based in California.

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