Another Weak Link in the Evolutionary Armor

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The universities are controlled by liberals, and they set the proper bounds of discussion. But one of them fired a creationist, and in doing so have revealed a weakness in their position…

This is not actually a new story. The article that appeared in my social media feeds this past week was new, but the facts of the case are actually a year old. Nevertheless, it is worth a few minutes of your time to hear the details of the matter.

FIRED FOR REPORTING THE FACTS

Mark Armitage was a scientist for California State University at Northridge until his paper slipped through the gates. Then, magically, funding for his program dried up:

While at a dig at Hell Creek formation in Montana, the scientist, Mark Armitage, came upon the largest triceratops horn ever unearthed at the site. When examining the horn under a high-powered microscope back at CSUN, Armitage was fascinated to see the soft tissue. The discovery stunned members of the scientific community because it indicates that dinosaurs roamed the earth only thousands of years in the past rather than going extinct 60 million years ago.

According to court documents, shortly after the original soft tissue discovery, a university official challenged the motives of Armitage, by shouting at him, “We are not going to tolerate your religion in this department!”

Armitage, a published scientist of over 30 years, was subsequently let go after CSUN abruptly claimed his appointment at the university of 38 months had been temporary, and claimed a lack of funding for his position. This was news to him, and contradicted prior statements and documents from the university.

JUSTICE IS SERVED

Now, after three years of litigation, the university has settled their case with Armitage, reportedly giving him almost $400,000. The university claims they ended the case to save taxpayer dollars. Even though the award to Armitage is small, by failing to battle this to the bitter end, the university handed creationists a symbolic victory:

Alan Reinach, Armitage’s attorney, hailed the settlement as precedent-setting.

“We are not aware of any other cases where a creationist received a favorable outcome,” said Reinach, executive director of the Church State Council, a nonprofit California public interest legal organization.

“This was truly a historic case.”

CSUN has downplayed its decision to settle, saying in a statement that the university is committed to religious freedom and freedom of speech.

“The Superior Court did not rule on the merits of Mr. Armitage’s complaint, and this voluntary settlement is not an indication of wrong-doing,” according to a CSUN statement published in Retraction Watch. “The decision to settle was based on a desire to avoid the costs involved in a protracted legal battle, including manpower, time and state dollars.”

But Reinach countered: “They certainly would not have paid that kind of money if they did not recognize that we had them dead to rights. The state doesn’t put large, six-figure settlement money out unless they are really concerned they are going to lose.”

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